Sunday, October 20

Experts discuss the detention of hospital patients who are unable to pay fees

According to multiple researchers, some hospitals across developing nations violate patients' human rights and detain them for failing to pay their bills. Several reports found the practice to be widespread across Africa, Europe and Asia. (Niveda Tennety/Assistant Photo editor)

According to multiple researchers, some hospitals across developing nations violate patients' human rights and detain them for failing to pay their bills. Several reports found the practice to be widespread across Africa, Europe and Asia. (Niveda Tennety/Assistant Photo editor)

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Some hospitals across developing nations violate patients’ human rights and detain them for failing to pay their bills, according to multiple researchers. Multiple news reports and research papers uncovered the extent of hospital detentions, referring to the practice of unlawfully detaining patients within the institution until the patients’ incurred costs are fully paid.


Female sexuality activist and psychology professor Laurie Mintz (left) and "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend" actress Rachel Bloom (right) answered questions from the audience about the importance of the pleasure of sex for women at a campus event Thursday. (Axel Lopez/Daily Bruin senior staff)
Female sexuality activist and psychology professor Laurie Mintz (left) and "Crazy Ex-Girlfriend" actress Rachel Bloom (right) answered questions from the audience about the importance of the pleasure of sex for women at a campus event Thursday. (Axel Lopez/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Baljit S. Khakh, a professor of physiology and neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, led a study which identified a method that could halt the progression of Huntington’s disease and alleviate some of the damage it causes. (Daily Bruin file photo)
Baljit S. Khakh, a professor of physiology and neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, led a study which identified a method that could halt the progression of Huntington’s disease and alleviate some of the damage it causes. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Jewel Thais-Williams owned Catch One, a disco on Pico Boulevard, from 1973 to 2015. The disco appealed to the black and queer communities in Los Angeles. The city council president named the intersection of Pico Boulevard and Norton Avenue after her Oct. 5. (Liz Ketcham/Photo editor)
Jewel Thais-Williams owned Catch One, a disco on Pico Boulevard, from 1973 to 2015. The disco appealed to the black and queer communities in Los Angeles. The city council president named the intersection of Pico Boulevard and Norton Avenue after her Oct. 5. (Liz Ketcham/Photo editor)

Members of Enigma, a science fiction and fantasy gaming club on campus, participate in activities ranging from tabletop role-playing games to vampire tag. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin Staff)
Members of Enigma, a science fiction and fantasy gaming club on campus, participate in activities ranging from tabletop role-playing games to vampire tag. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin Staff)

A study from the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies found that black children in Los Angeles county face educational, health and social disadvantages. Failing to recognize the connections between education, health and poverty makes it difficult for policy to effectively counter these disadvantages, according to the study. (Daily Bruin file photo)
A study from the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies found that black children in Los Angeles county face educational, health and social disadvantages. Failing to recognize the connections between education, health and poverty makes it difficult for policy to effectively counter these disadvantages, according to the study. (Daily Bruin file photo)



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