Saturday, August 18

(Juliette Le Saint/Daily Bruin)
(Juliette Le Saint/Daily Bruin)

(Creative Commons photo by iDominick via Wikimedia Commons)
(Creative Commons photo by iDominick via Wikimedia Commons)

Jared Ortaliza, a second-year human biology and society student, and Mary McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student (left to right), planned a showcase called “Visible People” to create a platform for AAPI representation in pop culture. (Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Assistant photo editor)

‘Visible People’ to showcase Asian-American, Pacific Islander cultural diversity

Mary McHenry and Jared Ortaliza came up with the idea for the show “Visible People” while eating dishes of pad thai and pad see ew. McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student and Ortaliza, a second-year pre-human biology and society student, had both been thinking independently about putting together a showcase of Asian-American and Pacific Islander artists. Read more...

Jared Ortaliza, a second-year human biology and society student, and Mary McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student (left to right), planned a showcase called “Visible People” to create a platform for AAPI representation in pop culture. (Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Assistant photo editor)

"The Problem with Apu," a 2017 documentary starring comedian Hari Kondabolu, will be screened Tuesday at UCLA. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Kondabolu, where students can engage with issues of cinematic racism and stereotyping. (Courtesy of truTV)
"The Problem with Apu," a 2017 documentary starring comedian Hari Kondabolu, will be screened Tuesday at UCLA. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Kondabolu, where students can engage with issues of cinematic racism and stereotyping. (Courtesy of truTV)

(Jae Su/Daily Bruin)
(Jae Su/Daily Bruin)

Second-year theater student Aliyah Turner portrays the main character Oya “In the Red and Brown Water.” While rehearsing for the production, Turner said she tried to give more agency to her character by making her movements the driving force in choreographed scenes.  (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Student play layers fantasy, reality to subvert racial stereotypes

Characters inspired by Yoruban gods will layer with the gritty realism of an impoverished Louisiana town to create the mythical world of the upcoming play, “In the Red and Brown Water.” Jayongela Wilder, graduate student in directing and the play’s director, said the duality of magic and realism was one of the many ways that the show works to subvert the limited and stereotypical representation of women and people of color in conventional theater. Read more...

Second-year theater student Aliyah Turner portrays the main character Oya “In the Red and Brown Water.” While rehearsing for the production, Turner said she tried to give more agency to her character by making her movements the driving force in choreographed scenes.  (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

(20th Century Fox)
(20th Century Fox)


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