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Gallery: Deconstructing UCLA’s built environment

By Daniel Leibowitz, Emma Skinner

May 14, 2018 3:08 p.m.

When New York-based architect Rafael Viñoly took on the project of the California NanoSystems Institute, he had a difficult issue to overcome: the parking structure in the middle of the space. He built a series of staircases and bridges connecting the different labs areas throughout the building to add an interesting twist to the structure.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

The California NanoSystems Institute faces the Court of Sciences at UCLA. Its metal and glass facade, accented with brick, fits the building into the theme of its peers such as La Kretz Hall and Young Hall.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

Collaborative architects Bob Anshen and Steve Allen designed the Molecular Sciences Building in 1994. The space highlights the many research buildings around campus and how architecture helps the function of the building. Air supply ducts around the exterior of the building help with the ventilation throughout the labs.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

The architectural style of the Molecular Sciences Building embodies the idea of form following function. A modern-style exterior consisting of various concrete textures, blue windows and creative uses of space along with many technical feats incorporated into the structure serve the building’s purpose of presenting itself as futuristic and science-oriented.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

Split into two main wings, the Molecular Sciences Building is connected at the corner by a concrete spiral staircase.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

Introduced to new students every year during campus tours with a legend about walking between its tall pillars and receiving corresponding grades, Young hall is the home of UCLA’s chemistry and biochemistry departments, among others.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

Kevin Daly designed the Evelyn and Mo Ostin Music Center keeping the rest of the campus in mind. He used the same color bricks found on buildings such as Powell Library and Royce Hall but used terracotta instead. His ultimate goal was to merge the modern architecture of Franz Hall with the Romanesque style of Royce Quad.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

The Evelyn and Mo Ostin Music Center was funded by a donation of $10 million by music industry executive and philanthropist Morris ''Mo'' Ostin, and was designed by Los Angeles-based architectural firm Daly Genik Architects. Located near the inverted fountain, this building stands out from its older neighbors with a vibrant and modern exterior.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

Better known for its history than its architecture, Boelter Hall was built by Jesse Stanton and William Stockwell in 1959. The building itself is home to the first message ever sent over the internet 10 years after its construction. During the 2011 renovations, the architect spelled out ''Lo and Behold'' in binary code on the tile floor as tribute to the building’s history.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

Three classrooms make up Kinsey Pavilion. Originally, the Humanities Building was named Kinsey Hall but in 2005 the name was changed and these physics rooms now hold the title of Kinsey. Edgar Lee Kinsey, the namesake of the pavilion, taught physics at UCLA from 1928 until 1961 when he passed away.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

Constructed in 1964, Bunche Hall was one of the first modern style buildings on campus. As is typical with this era of architecture, the building utilizes the rectangular shape in its windows and overall structure. It is lifted off the ground by rectangular columns to allow for pedestrians to make their way to the heart of North Campus.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

The Dickson Art Center was rebuilt as the Broad Art Center by Richard Meier and Michael Palladino after damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. It was constructed around the idea of sustainable architecture and capitalizes on natural daylight and ventilation as well as using the building’s original concrete structure.

(Emma Skinner/Daily Bruin)

A lattice of horizontal blades and roofs allow control of south elevation sun exposure in the classrooms and art studios of UCLA’s Broad Art Center. The center’s exterior is also home to a site-specific 42.5 ton sculpture by Richard Serra.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

Home to the School of Architecture and Urban Design, Perloff Hall overlooks the northern half of the Sunken Gardens in North Campus. The main courtyard is bordered on three sides by sets of large pillars.

(Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin)

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Daniel Leibowitz | Photographer
Emma Skinner | Photographer
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