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Gallery: Behind the mask of musical ‘Love Never Dies’

By Amy Dixon, Alexandra Del Rosario, Anushka Jain

April 15, 2018 4:46 p.m.

The black gondolas display each costume worn in “Love Never Dies.” Each character is designated a section of a gondola, labeled with the actor’s name. The costumes are placed in the order they are worn during the show. About 100 costumes are worn throughout the show.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

Wigs and headpieces sit atop the costume-filled gondolas. Some actors wear one wig throughout the show, while others undergo multiple wig changes. The microphones are often built into actors’ wigs.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

Costumes are not only double-checked by crew prior to the show, but also during the show when the actors are on stage. Zippers, clasps and sewing must be tested repeatedly. The crew stays prepared to solve any mishaps and to assist the cast in its costume changes. Actors can sometimes wear up to five costumes in eight minutes and conduct their changes in as little as 10 seconds.

(Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin)

The animal figurines are placed on a turntable to resemble a merry-go-round on stage. Ensemble members will sit on the horses, bringing the Coney Island amusement park to life.

(Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin)

The placements of the larger-than-life mirror displays are determined by the actors’ positions. Based on what the audience is meant to see, the mirrors are placed to either look smaller or larger than the actors.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

Backstage is home to electricians, cleaners, carpenters and department heads. The crew coordinates within the open spaces, a routine just as choreographed as the actual performance.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

The crew works deliberately to arrange the stage before doors open. The most chaotic action begins about 10 minutes before showtime and lingers for the first few minutes of the show, said assistant company manager Justin Coffman.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

The tilted nature of the desk was meant to convey a sense of discomfort to the audience. The prop was built with a degree of uneasiness in mind.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

Andrew Iverson spends about half of an hour cleaning the mirror displays for the show. Some of the mirrors are wooden-sided, and some even have actors who stand in them prior to debuting on stage.

(Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin)

The crew of “Love Never Dies” begins arranging the stage for the upcoming show. Though the stage seems relatively small from backstage, the audience’s vantage point creates an illusion, making the stage seem larger in scale.

(Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin)

Occasionally, props must be lifted upward to create more space for the props coating the ground. All of the props are East Coast-based, with suitcases and instruments being some of the ones that decorate the backstage.

(Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin)

Structured beams fill both sides of the stage, acting as a facade of a roller coaster. The beams hold approximately 3,000 light bulbs in total.

(Amy Dixon/Daily Bruin)

The Hollywood Pantages Theatre will soon open its doors to 2,703 guests. The audience anticipates the performance as much as they do the interiors of the theater, which feature hand-painted decorations made with real gold. The lighting helps the theater appear much deeper than it actually is, adding to its grandiose appeal. Audience members can enjoy the production from the mezzanine or from the very front row, as the theater is designed to create the same viewing experience for everyone.

(Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin)

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Amy Dixon | Alumna
Dixon was the 2018-2019 Photo editor. She was previously a 2017-2018 assistant Photo editor.
Dixon was the 2018-2019 Photo editor. She was previously a 2017-2018 assistant Photo editor.
Del Rosario is the 2018-2019 prime content editor. She was previously an A&E staff reporter.
Del Rosario is the 2018-2019 prime content editor. She was previously an A&E staff reporter.
Anushka Jain | PRIME director
Jain is the PRIME director for the 2020-2021 school year. She was previously the PRIME content editor during the 2019-2020 school year and an assistant Arts editor for the Lifestyle beat during the 2018-2019 school year.
Jain is the PRIME director for the 2020-2021 school year. She was previously the PRIME content editor during the 2019-2020 school year and an assistant Arts editor for the Lifestyle beat during the 2018-2019 school year.
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