Friday, April 10



UCLA researchers test potential autism treatment on mice

UCLA researchers successfully tested a potential treatment for visual deficiencies associated with autism by manipulating malfunctioning neurons in mice. The team of researchers studied the mechanisms behind fragile X syndrome, one of the most common genetic causes of autism and identified the deficit neurons that impaired the mice’s ability to process visual information. Read more...

Photo: The researchers studied the mechanisms behind fragile X syndrome, one of the most common genetic causes of autism. They identified and treated a neuron deficit, enabling mice with fragile X syndrome to learn a visual task as quickly as healthy mice. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)


Researchers invent device to synthesize tissue that could be used in transplants

UCLA bioengineers developed a device that uses 3D printing technology to create artificial tissue that could be used during transplants. A team of researchers led by Ali Khademhosseini, an engineering professor at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, discovered a technology that can print tissue using multiple materials. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers 3D printed tissue that could be used in implants. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)


TEDxUCLA speakers discuss effects of altruism on brain, community

This article was updated May 1 at 10:05 p.m. Experts said stimulating certain regions of the brain can make an individual more generous at an event Tuesday night. Read more...

Photo: The UCLA Healthy Campus Initiative invited Manal Aboelata, managing director at Prevention Institute, and Marco Iacoboni, professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences and director of a neurology lab at UCLA, to speak about the significance of altruism. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)


Researchers find correlation between sedentary behavior and the brain

UCLA researchers found that individuals who spend too much time sitting down may be more likely to have memory impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. In a study published Thursday, researchers at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior examined a group of 35 middle-aged and older adults and found a correlation between increased sedentary behavior and reduced thickness of the medial temporal lobe, a region of the brain critical for memory formation. Read more...

Photo: Researchers at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior examined a group of 35 middle-aged and older adults and found a correlation between increased sedentary behavior and reduced thickness of the medial temporal lobe, a region of the brain critical for memory formation. (Daily Bruin file photo)