Tuesday, August 20

Jordan Boatman portrays Zoe in “The Niceties,” which runs at the Geffen Playhouse until May 12. Her character seeks advice from her professor, and the two disagree on her thesis, laying the framework for a much larger conversation about racial demographics and discrimination on both college campuses and society at large.
(Courtesy of T. Charles Erickson)

Academic discussion turns intense in play’s portrayal of contemporary race relations

A traditional office hours discussion will escalate into an impassioned debate on the fundamentals of American society Tuesday. “The Niceties,” a play running through May 12 at the Geffen Playhouse, showcases this debate to illustrate the reverberations of racial injustice. Read more...

Photo: Jordan Boatman portrays Zoe in “The Niceties,” which runs at the Geffen Playhouse until May 12. Her character seeks advice from her professor, and the two disagree on her thesis, laying the framework for a much larger conversation about racial demographics and discrimination on both college campuses and society at large. (Courtesy of T. Charles Erickson)

Jordan Boatman portrays Zoe in “The Niceties,” which runs at the Geffen Playhouse until May 12. Her character seeks advice from her professor, and the two disagree on her thesis, laying the framework for a much larger conversation about racial demographics and discrimination on both college campuses and society at large.
(Courtesy of T. Charles Erickson)


Daniel Shemtob is the owner of TLT Food, a restaurant with a location in Westwood Village. On Feb. 20, TLT celebrated their new business plan, which includes drop-off and setup catering options for the UCLA community. The TLT team is looking to cater to UCLA events including sports games and Spring Sing, hoping to serve affordable food made from scratch. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Owner of TLT Food speaks on success of restaurant, goals for UCLA community

Daniel Shemtob is the definition of the millennial persona amplified. Aside from his round glasses and neon green TLT attire, the first thing I noticed about him was his tattoo; “I am the future” read legibly across his right forearm. Read more...

Photo: Daniel Shemtob is the owner of TLT Food, a restaurant with a location in Westwood Village. On Feb. 20, TLT celebrated their new business plan, which includes drop-off and setup catering options for the UCLA community. The TLT team is looking to cater to UCLA events including sports games and Spring Sing, hoping to serve affordable food made from scratch. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Daniel Shemtob is the owner of TLT Food, a restaurant with a location in Westwood Village. On Feb. 20, TLT celebrated their new business plan, which includes drop-off and setup catering options for the UCLA community. The TLT team is looking to cater to UCLA events including sports games and Spring Sing, hoping to serve affordable food made from scratch. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Sobok, a South Korean dessert chain, recently opened a new location in Koreatown. The outlet uses sobok, an ice cream made from oats and honey, as the base for all its desserts. Patrons can also choose add-ons like sweeteners and ice balls made from rice cakes. (Tanmay Shankar/Daily Bruin)

Restaurant review: South Korean dessert shop Sobok disappoints with monotonous flavor, aesthetic

Gummy goodness oozes from a pastel pink swirl. Rivers of saccharine soft serve melt along the edges of a paper cup. Fruity scents permeate the room, and quirky flavors dominate the menu. Read more...

Photo: Sobok, a South Korean dessert chain, recently opened a new location in Koreatown. The outlet uses sobok, an ice cream made from oats and honey, as the base for all its desserts. Patrons can also choose add-ons like sweeteners and ice balls made from rice cakes. (Tanmay Shankar/Daily Bruin)

Sobok, a South Korean dessert chain, recently opened a new location in Koreatown. The outlet uses sobok, an ice cream made from oats and honey, as the base for all its desserts. Patrons can also choose add-ons like sweeteners and ice balls made from rice cakes. (Tanmay Shankar/Daily Bruin)

"Saturday Night Live" actress Julia Sweeney's "Older and Wider" is running at the Geffen Playhouse from Tuesday to Feb. 17. The show presents topics like feminism, religion and cancer with a humorous spin, Sweeney said. (Courtesy of Timothy M. Schmidt)

‘SNL’ alum returns from 10-year career hiatus with own show, “Older and Wider”

Julia Sweeney took a break from Hollywood to raise her daughter in the Chicago suburbs. Years later, the actress and comedian returned to Los Angeles with several stories to tell, ready to launch back into show business. Read more...

Photo: "Saturday Night Live" actress Julia Sweeney's "Older and Wider" is running at the Geffen Playhouse from Tuesday to Feb. 17. The show presents topics like feminism, religion and cancer with a humorous spin, Sweeney said. (Courtesy of Timothy M. Schmidt)

"Saturday Night Live" actress Julia Sweeney's "Older and Wider" is running at the Geffen Playhouse from Tuesday to Feb. 17. The show presents topics like feminism, religion and cancer with a humorous spin, Sweeney said. (Courtesy of Timothy M. Schmidt)

Maya Montañez Smukler, wrote "Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema." The UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program will present a film-archive series based on the book. (Courtesy of Art Streiber)

Film archive series to shed light on Hollywood’s unrecognized female directors

This post was updated Jan. 26 at 7:08 a.m. From the mid-1930s until the mid-1960s, there were only two female directors in Hollywood: Dorothy Arzner and Ida Lupino. Read more...

Photo: Maya Montañez Smukler, wrote "Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema." The UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program will present a film-archive series based on the book. (Courtesy of Art Streiber)

Maya Montañez Smukler, wrote "Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema." The UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program will present a film-archive series based on the book. (Courtesy of Art Streiber)

Alumnus Leland Frankel worked alongside alumnus Venk Potula to create “Woke,” a short film following Sunny, a Pakistani-American aspiring rapper, and Rebecca, an African-American activist. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

Alumni’s short film questions intersection of art, social activism

Art for art’s sake has been a long-standing debate. UCLA alumni Leland Frankel and Venk Potula dissect this issue in their new short film “Woke.” The two created the film using a script originally intended for a playwriting competition in New York City. Read more...

Photo: Alumnus Leland Frankel worked alongside alumnus Venk Potula to create “Woke,” a short film following Sunny, a Pakistani-American aspiring rapper, and Rebecca, an African-American activist. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

Alumnus Leland Frankel worked alongside alumnus Venk Potula to create “Woke,” a short film following Sunny, a Pakistani-American aspiring rapper, and Rebecca, an African-American activist. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)