Thursday, December 12

A team at the Luskin Center for Innovation has received a $3 million grant from the California State Water Resources Board to conduct a statewide assessment of water systems need. The team will analyze data provided by the board to identify ways to improve water treatment and transportation. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin staff)

Luskin Center for Innovation receives $3M grant to assess California’s water needs

California became the first state to recognize that access to clean and affordable water is a human right in 2012. Still, according to Peter Roquemore, a researcher at the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation, small, low-income minority communities do not have access to a steady supply of clean water. Read more...

Photo: A team at the Luskin Center for Innovation has received a $3 million grant from the California State Water Resources Board to conduct a statewide assessment of water systems need. The team will analyze data provided by the board to identify ways to improve water treatment and transportation. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin staff)

A team at the Luskin Center for Innovation has received a $3 million grant from the California State Water Resources Board to conduct a statewide assessment of water systems need. The team will analyze data provided by the board to identify ways to improve water treatment and transportation. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin staff)

The Garg Lab announced a new website, R/S Chemistry, in early August. The project began as a collaboration between professor Neil Garg and undergraduate students. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

New organic chemistry website hopes to be engaging, interactive student resource

A team of UCLA researchers created a website to help teach organic chemistry. The website, R/S Chemistry, focuses on teaching students principles of organic chemistry – a branch of chemistry that deals with carbon-based molecules. Read more...

Photo: The Garg Lab announced a new website, R/S Chemistry, in early August. The project began as a collaboration between professor Neil Garg and undergraduate students. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

The Garg Lab announced a new website, R/S Chemistry, in early August. The project began as a collaboration between professor Neil Garg and undergraduate students. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

(Courtney Fortier/Daily Bruin contributor)

Crazy cat lady cliche is misleading, according to new study by UCLA researchers

A study conducted at UCLA found that the “crazy cat lady” stereotype may be more fiction than fact. The results found there is no substantial difference in self-reported symptoms of depression and anxiety between people who own cats, dogs or no pets, and concluded there is no evidence to support the “crazy cat lady” stereotype. Read more...

Photo: (Courtney Fortier/Daily Bruin contributor)

(Courtney Fortier/Daily Bruin contributor)

Emeran Mayer, a professor at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at USC, received an $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism.  (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA, USC researchers study role of gut microbiome in development of autism

Researchers from UCLA and USC are researching the link between gut microbes and autism to better understand autism and its potential causes. Emeran Mayer, a professor of medicine, physiology, psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at University of Southern California, received a three-year $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism. Read more...

Photo: Emeran Mayer, a professor at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at USC, received an $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Emeran Mayer, a professor at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at USC, received an $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism.  (Daily Bruin file photo)


The snow-TENG generates a small amount of electricity for a variety of uses, from weather tracking to powering wearable clothing technology. (Courtesy of Abdelsalam Ahmed)

UCLA researchers develop wearable device that generates electricity from snow

UCLA researchers created a device that can generate electricity from snow. The device, called the snow-TENG, is a thin, transparent sheet of mostly silicone, which can be inexpensively manufactured using a 3D printer. Read more...

Photo: The snow-TENG generates a small amount of electricity for a variety of uses, from weather tracking to powering wearable clothing technology. (Courtesy of Abdelsalam Ahmed)

The snow-TENG generates a small amount of electricity for a variety of uses, from weather tracking to powering wearable clothing technology. (Courtesy of Abdelsalam Ahmed)

Ochan Otim, a chemistry instructor for UCLA Extension, led a group of researchers that identified toxic metals in sachet alcohol, a popular type of alcohol in Uganda. (Courtesy of UCLA Extension)

UCLA instructor leads study finding carcinogenic metals in popular African alcohol

A group of researchers led by a UCLA instructor has identified several toxic metals in sachet alcohol, a popular form of alcohol in Uganda. Many of these metals, including lead, arsenic and chromium, are known to cause cancer. Read more...

Photo: Ochan Otim, a chemistry instructor for UCLA Extension, led a group of researchers that identified toxic metals in sachet alcohol, a popular type of alcohol in Uganda. (Courtesy of UCLA Extension)

Ochan Otim, a chemistry instructor for UCLA Extension, led a group of researchers that identified toxic metals in sachet alcohol, a popular type of alcohol in Uganda. (Courtesy of UCLA Extension)