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Daily Bruin abroad: Indonesia

By Kitty Hu

Oct. 2, 2019 5:10 p.m.

On Indonesia’s Independence Day, Aug. 17, locals and tourists boarded jeeps or walked several kilometers to reach the top of Mount Penanjakan for a sunrise view of Mount Bromo. Pictured is the view of Mount Bromo from Mount Penanjakan.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

A shrine sits with several offerings at the top of Mount Bromo’s crater rim in East Java. A small pump of smoke rises from the crater. It is still an active volcano, although visitors flock across the Sand Sea to climb to the top every day.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

A decorated bamboo pole called a penjor sits to the right of the entrance to an elementary school. A shrine sits on the left of the entrance as well.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

Every few steps in Denpasar, people can be seen preparing, bringing and praying with offerings, which are called canang sari. Several bamboo pieces have turned brown, but a fresh, green canang sari has been placed at a small house shrine.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

Motorcycles, pedestrians, trucks, cars and occasionally animals maneuver through the streets of Denpasar.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

A street vendor fries another batch of gorengan, a fried snack. Some popular varieties include pisang goreng (banana fritters), bakwan jagung (corn fritters), tempe goreng (fried tempeh) and tahu isi (tofu and vegetables fritters).

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

Two motorcyclists return home, passing by a local warung, which is a small family-owned restaurant or café along the street. Warungs will usually have an assortment of already-cooked traditional dishes on display for hungry passersby to select from.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

A boy bikes past a small market in North Denpasar. Families will often live on the second floor or in the back if they decide to use the ground floor space to sell snacks or meals.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

Twice a year in Bali for Galungan and Kuningan, one of the most popular ceremonies in Bali, penjor fill the streets and are placed in front of each house or business so that they face the mountain. Sometimes, penjors will also be featured at large temple festivals.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

A man waits for customers as the sun sets. He has made the bamboo dishes by himself, which people will use to hold small snacks and flowers as offerings. He is also selling some bags of krupuk, or rice crackers, which hang from the top of his umbrella.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

Stray dogs roam a neighborhood in North Denpasar. Each Balinese compound is typically gated, especially if there is more than one family or house in the compound.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

Many Balinese people are Hindu. Each house compound has a family shrine that is usually placed in the northeast corner because the east is associated with life, and therefore is most auspicious. The shrine pictured has a thatched top made of black aren fibers from sugar palm trees, which can only be used for religious purposes.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

The Indonesian flag waves at the entrance to two neighborhoods in North Denpasar. Penjor, still left over from Galungan and Kuningan, decorate the front of the house compounds.

(Kitty Hu/Daily Bruin)

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Kitty Hu | Alumna
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