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Daily Bruin Abroad: Taiwan

By Elise Tsai

January 12, 2019 12:59 pm

A cluster of apartment buildings nestle in the northern hillside mountains of Taiwan. Nearly 24 million people live in Taiwan, densely packing the small island, which is around the size of Maryland.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

This ornate building is an ancestral family shrine dedicated to the lineage of “Wu.” These temples are usually used for rituals and festivals for the family and other community-related events.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

Life-size sculpted soldiers at Juming Museum stare off into the misty hills toward Huiming Temple. The 26-acre outdoor museum, located in the district of Jinshan, features the reverend work of Taiwanese sculptor, Ju Ming, who spent 4 years creating the project called ''Armed Forces'' under his ''Living World'' series. His intends to pay respect to the soldiers who have protected Taiwan through his work instead of glorifying war.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

A cook fries rice over a hot wok at Shilin Night Market. There are well over 70 night markets in Taiwan, providing tourists and locals with steaming food, fresh fruit, arcade games and shopping.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

The Taiwan High Speed Rail, which opened in 2007, runs from the northern city of Taipei City to the southern city of Kaohsiung. It can reach speeds of up to 186 mph, allowing passengers to travel the length of the island in 105 minutes.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

A motorcyclist whizzes past a small breakfast stand in Taipei City. There are more than 14 million motorcycles in Taiwan, meaning there is nearly one bike for every two people who live in Taiwan.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

Taiwanese shaved ice is a popular sweet treat on a hot, humid day. A large, colored block of flavored ice is shaved into ribbons and topped with sweetened condensed milk, fresh fruit, ice cream and syrup.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

A fountain of water sprays out of a painting of a young boy in Kaohsiung Port Warehouse No. 2. This warehouse, located in the southern district of Yancheng, has transformed from a railway port into a modern center for shopping, creative arts, dining and exhibition.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

Shifen Old Street, located in Pingxi township within New Taipei City, is a bustling railroad town where tourists can come to eat local food and go shopping, and release personalized lanterns into the air. Messages written on the lanterns are hopes and wishes for the New Year, such as luck, prosperity and good health.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall is a very recognizable national monument in Taiwan. The memorial hall sits on the east end of Liberty Square and is surrounded by beautiful gardens. Inside, a large statue commemorates the former president of the Republic of China.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

On the north and south sides of the memorial hall, the National Concert Hall and National Theater and sit symmetrically across from each other. Both are used as national performing arts centers, hosting concerts, operas, orchestras and plays.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

The National Theater and National Concert Hall were completed in 1987, costing around 7.4 billion New Taiwan dollars, around $240 million US dollars to complete. Top elected leaders in Taiwan attend concerts in the arenas and nationally recognized artists and musicians perform as guests.

(Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

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