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Gallery: Día de los Muertos

By Rachel Hefner

Oct. 29, 2018 5:01 p.m.

Héctor, a character from Pixar’s recent production ''Coco,'' welcomes guests into the cathedral art exhibit at the entrance of the Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Nazario Segura, a member of the Tlecoatl Aztec Dancers, embodies death through the gray and black feathers adorning his costume.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

One of hundreds of performers makes her way from the main entrance to the main stage.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Traditional dancers elaborately portray the art of Aztec war, bringing to life the history of the eagle and jaguar warriors renowned in the Aztec civilization.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Models from The H&Mua Studio, Alexandra Avila and Leah Sanchez, represent the goddess Coatlicue, known in Aztec culture as the Great Mother in whom life and death intertwine.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

In a procession down the cemetery’s primary walkway, performers honor ancient Aztec and Mexica culture through traditional music and dance.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Over 100 altars pepper the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. On the ofrendas, or offering sites, of these altars, participants place photos and offerings to remember family members, friends and revered historical icons.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

A dancer makes her way to the main stage during the ceremonial procession kicking off the event. Upon reaching the stage, an Aztec blessing is performed with the use of copal incense to draw spirits home after they die.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

A performer represents Coatlicue through intricate costume design. The vibrant natural colors and the skeleton child held in her arms demonstrate the duality of life and death.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

A performer in the opening ceremony displays the dramatic featherwork unique to Aztec culture.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Mimi Downey adds the last touches to her family’s altar. Contained on the ofrenda are rosary beads belonging to her father, false teeth representing her mother, and a mirror to remind onlookers of the inevitability of their own future death.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

During the procession, a performer blows into a ceremonial conch shell representative of the Aztec god Ehecatl, who is said to have blown life into the vacant world.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Members of Grupo Folklorico Tzintzuni demonstrate traditional Mexican-style dances as part of their colorful altar.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Melanie Gutierrez poses for pictures before entering the annual costume contest.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Laughing skeletons surround a table carefully designed by Paula Jaszkowski and her son, Gibson Reedy. Jaszkowski said the idea stemmed from her mother’s love for cooking and entertaining, with each skeleton representative of her siblings.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Elisa Ross and Mari Mirabal show off their elaborately detailed costumes. The pair have faithfully attended the annual Los Angeles Day of the Dead festival every year for the past decade.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

Specially trained makeup artists paint visitors’ faces to match the sugar skull designs associated with Día de los Muertos.

(Rachel Hefner/Daily Bruin)

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