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Tracking COVID-19 at UCLA2020 Racial Justice Movement

Club sports: Archery

By Habeba Mostafa, Edward Figueroa

Feb. 8, 2018 4:28 p.m.

In archery, a left- or right-handed bow is not used based off the archer’s dominant hand, but rather by the archer’s dominant eye. Eyesight dominance can be determined simply by forming a triangle with your hands and focusing on a distant object. Close your left eye, then your right eye, and whichever eye keeps the object centered is your dominant eye.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

The archery club’s recruitment philosophy is to accept members year-round, regardless of new members’ levels of expertise or prior experience.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

Eric Wang, a first-year mathematics of computation student, uses his bow sights to lock in on his target.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

Edward Tang, a third-year philosophy student, practices his technique while winding up for a shot.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

Hieu Nguyen, a first-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student, enjoys the moment in archery that takes places just before releasing the arrow. “If you feel it in your arm, you’re doing it wrong,” Nguyen said. He said the proper form is in using one’s back muscles.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

There is an 18-meter distance between Wang and his target, which is typical for practice sessions and indoor competitions during the winter. For outdoor competitions, however, the distance between archer and target can rise to a maximum of 70 meters.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

Gerald Diep-Tran, a first-year computer science student, said archery can be intensive for beginners. The advice he offers is to learn form and aim, and to practice often.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

Many members of the UCLA Club Archery team only picked up the sport over the past four-to-six months.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

This target includes signatures from U.S. Olympic archers including Brady Ellison, Mackenzie Brown and Paralympian Matt Stutzman. The archery club had the opportunity to meet with the Olympians before the 2016 Rio Olympics.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

In archery, each ring on a target represents a different number of points, with the outermost white circle indicating a total of one point, and the innermost yellow circle earning a total of 10.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

Matthew Singson had seven years of prior experience with the Junior Olympic Archery Development, a program that teaches young people the skills necessary for archery, before joining UCLA’s archery club. The first-year astrophysics student said the best way to learn is to take it one step at a time.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

A bow stand allows archers to safely place their bows down when not in use, protecting the string as well as the upper and lower limbs.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

Equipment manager Brianna Vanden Bosch, a fourth-year art history student, takes pride in her archery ability – a skill she had wanted to gain since she was young. Bosch said while archery is not hard to begin to learn, it can be hard to improve. She encourages new learners to not become discouraged if they feel inadequate in the beginning.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

Tang and Wang remove arrows from the targets on the bale.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

Angela Lam, a fourth-year computational and systems biology student, has been fascinated with archery ever since she watched the 2008 Summer Olympics. Lam, who is serving her second year as the club’s president, holds a trophy earned at the Easton Collegiate Indoors Tournament, which took place Jan. 13 to 14.

(Habeba Mostafa/Daily Bruin)

The basic archery stance is a critical step in an archer’s shot sequence, enabling the shooter to set up for stability and allow for proper upper-body rotation and alignment.

(Edward Figueroa/Daily Bruin)

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Habeba Mostafa | Photographer
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