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By Andrew Arifin

Nov. 20, 2017 5:00 p.m.

Fiona Zhang, a second-year sociology student, has been vegan for a little more than a year, and was vegetarian for about a year before that.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Zhang chose to become a vegetarian mostly for environmental reasons, but when she decided to become vegan, it was for moral and ethical reasons. Learning about the environmental impact that meat, dairy and egg production has on the planet pushed her to become vegan.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Some common misconceptions people have about being vegan are that it is an expensive or unsatisfying lifestyle, Zhang said. Others may worry that vegans don’t get enough protein. But by learning what works best for her body and paying attention to what she needs to keep herself nourished, Zhang said she has stayed healthy and satisfied with her diet.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Stir-fries are Zhang’s go-to dishes. She draws inspiration from online blogs and social media accounts, as well as from her mother’s recipes.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

For those is interested in going vegan, Zhang recommends being open to trying new foods rather than focusing on what they can’t eat as a vegan.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Soham Desai, a cognitive science student, said he loves the convenience and the variety of foods that Postmates provides, especially during busy times like midterm season.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Desai doesn’t have specific preferences on what he orders, as it usually depends on his mood and cravings. While he thinks Postmates is helpful, he believes it has made people less inclined to make home-cooked meals.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Mexican and Japanese food are Desai’s go-to choices when it comes to ordering food. He enjoys purchasing dishes that he knows he can’t make as easily on his own.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Minh Le, a fourth-year computer science student, started meal prepping a year and a half ago when he moved into the apartments. He found it to be an effective way to lose weight and save time and money.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

When shopping for ingredients, Le looks to buy in bulk. He buys packets of kale or broccoli that will last a week, and enough meat to last him two to three weeks.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Le finds most of his recipes online. He likes to keep his meals simple and efficient, using basic spices like salt, pepper, cayenne pepper and paprika.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

Le had to become accustomed to eating the same things week after week when he started meal prepping. Although chicken breast and broccoli get old really fast, Le spices thing up by varying his seasonings and ingredients. He also cooks more complex meals or dines out on the weekends.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

His go-to meal is baked chicken breast with salt, pepper, paprika, steamed broccoli and brown rice. He carefully weighs and portions out his protein for each meal.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

For someone starting out in meal prep, Le recommends starting simple. He also suggests starting small and prepping fewer meals – otherwise, it’s easy to get sick of eating the same thing repeatedly.

(Andrew Arifin/Daily Bruin)

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Andrew Arifin | Alumnus
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