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The Broad contemporary art museum opens to the public

By Daniel Alcazar

September 21, 2015 4:15 pm

The Broad, a new contemporary art museum, opened on Sept. 20, 2015. It was designed by architecture firm Diller Scofidio + Benfro and features a porous exterior "veil" intended to light the interior with natural light and a concrete interior structure that provides the core of the building.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Museum patrons made their way into the main galleries on the opening day of the Broad museum.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

"Death of Marxism, Woman of All Lands Unite," a wool tapestry piece by Polish artist Goshka Macuga featured live models wearing two other pieces by Macuga: Suit for Tichy 4 and Suit for Tichy 5. The juxtaposition of Karl Marx's grave and images of women from twentieth-century Czech artist Miroslav Tichý results in a feminist statement.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Two museum patrons look at a piece by photographer Thomas Struth, "Audience 5 (Galleria Dell'Accademia), Florenz" (left). "Audience 7 (Galleria Dell'Accademia), Florenz" (right) can also be seen. Struth photographs people as they look at famous works of art and comments on the interaction between the art viewer and the art itself.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Patrons watch "The Visitors (2012)," a video installation by Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson. The installation features nine projections of nine musicians playing the same piece of music in various rooms at Rokeby farms in New York. The whole sequence is shot in a single 64-minute take.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Five of nine drawings from "Untitled (Dancing Black Butterflies)" by American artist Mark Grotjahn. Grotjahn addresses how to present movement in drawing while using known art historical tropes like Renaissance perspective and Picasso's mask paintings in his color pencil drawings.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Part of "In the Land of the Dead, Stepping on the Tail of a Rainbow" by Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. This 82-foot long painting reflects on the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami in Japan by combining traditional Japanese painting with western influence as well as the otaku culture of Japan.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Another piece by Murakami titled Oval Buddha Silver. This is a sterling silver sculpture from 2008.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

The Broad is home to nearly 2,000 pieces of postwar art in their collection, and they cannot all be displayed. The stairs between the two floors of the building feature two windows that give museum goers a look into the stored artworks.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Hundreds of people filled the museum on Sunday to view the home of nearly 2,000 pieces of postwar art including Urs Fischer's untitled sculpture located in the lobby.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

A corner of a room dedicated to the artwork of German artist Joseph Beuys. From left to right, "Silberbesen und Besen ohne Haare" (1972), "Filzanzug" (1970), "Iphigenie/Titus Andronicus" (1985) and "Ohne Die Rose Tun Wir's Nicht" (1972). The Broad has 573 of Beuys' artworks in its collection. At the center of the room (far left) Anselm Kiefer's painting, "Deutschlands Geisteshelden," can be seen.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

"Michael Jackson and Bubbles," a sculpture by Jeff Koons from his 1988 Banality series. Koons intended to represent a popular culture icon through religious art motifs in order to reach a broad audience.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

The reflection in one of Koons most famous works of art is "Balloon Dog (blue)." It is part of Koons' ongoing series of artworks that use ritual celebrations as their subject matter. Here, the reflections offer a ever changing work of art as they distort the reflections of the surrounding environment.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Museum patrons viewed John (1971-72), a painting by Chuck Close. Close is known for his photorealist paintings where he painstakingly reproduces photographs working entirely from sight. John is one of Close's earliest paintings. In 1988, a spinal aneurysm resulted in partial quadriplegia for Close but he was able to resume painting by attaching a paintbrush to a hand splint.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

American artist Jasper Johns is one of the most important figures in contemporary art. This 1967 painting, Flag, made from encaustic and other found materials, is a painting of a preexisting symbol, a symbol that represented many ideas. This painting influenced the break down of modern art and marked the beginnings of postmodern ideas because it posed a question of whether this was an image of the idea, or just an object.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Two museum patrons view one of Johns earliest works, "Watchman." Made in 1964 while living abroad in Japan, Johns incorporates objects into his paintings contributing to the change from symbols and signs of modern art to actions and physical expressions of postmodern art.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

American artist Robert Rauschenberg, a close friend of Jasper Johns, was also an important figure in the transition to postmodern art. Here, his 1954 work "Combine" sits on a pedestal in front of his 1954 painting "Untitled" (left), and John's "Untitled" from 1975 (right). Both artist incorporated found objects into their paintings like newspapers and wallpaper.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

A corner of a room dedicated to the early work of American pop artist Andy Warhol. From left to right, "Most Wanted Men No. 6, Thomas Francis C." (1964), "Self Portrait" (1966), "Campbell's Soup Can (Clam Chowder - Manhattan Style) [Ferus Type]" (1962), "Small Torn Campbell's Soup Can (Pepper Pot)" (1962) and "Single Elvis [Ferus Type]" (1963). Andy Warhol is one of the artists that brought imagery and techniques of mass commercialism into the fine arts. He brought things considered to be "low" in the the "high" world of fine art.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Roy Lichtenstein, along with Andy Warhol, was one of the founders of pop art in the United States. His early works incorporated comics into his paintings. He would hand paint and reproduce the bebdat dot technique used in comic books of the 1960s as seen here (left) in his piece, "Live Ammo (Blang)" (1962). Also pictured here is his painted bronze sculpture from 1977, "Goldfish Bowl."

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

Two paintings by American artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, "Horn Players" (1983) (left) and "Eyes and Eggs" (1983) (right). "Horn Players" features two famous jazz musicians Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie and is a tribute bebop jazz. Basquiat's paintings were simultaneously autobiographical and social commentary.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

"Obnoxious Liberals" (1982) by Jean-Michel Basquiat. Acrylic, oil stick and spray paint on canvas.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

"Untitled" (1984) by Keith Haring, who was a close friend of Jean-Michel Basquiat and contributed to an art scene that was moving out of the galleries and into everyday life. This painting presents a critique of the excesses of capitalism.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

"Raymond and Toby" (1989) by American artist John Ahearn. Ahearn creates casts of people in his Bronx neighborhood. He displays his casts outside in the sidewalk outside of his studio so his work can feel authentic.

(Daniel Alcazar/Daily Bruin)

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Daniel Alcazar | Photo Editor
Daniel Alcazar is currently the Daily Bruin's photo editor. He is also a writer for Arts & Entertainment section. He was previously photographer from 2014-2015.
Daniel Alcazar is currently the Daily Bruin's photo editor. He is also a writer for Arts & Entertainment section. He was previously photographer from 2014-2015.
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