Saturday, November 18

No Offense, But: ASUCLA and beef


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No Offense is back for yet another riveting show. Join Opinion editor Keshav Tadimeti and assistant Opinion editors Jacqueline Alvarez and Abhishek Shetty as they talk about the Associated Students UCLA’s projected losses of more than $1 million in sales this fiscal year. Then, the editors switch around to talk about the Covel dining hall’s decision to introduce part-beef, part-plant blended patties, and whether UCLA is trying to force vegetables – and vegetarianism – down students’ throats.

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Opinion editor

Tadimeti is the Daily Bruin's Opinion editor. He was an assistant Opinion editor in the 2015-2016 school year. He tends to write about issues pertaining to the student body, the undergraduate student government and the administration, and blogs occasionally about computer science.

Assistant Opinion editor

Alvarez is an assistant Opinion editor. She previously contributed as an opinion columnist and writes about topics such as campus life, Westwood and Los Angeles city programs.

Assistant Opinion editor

Shetty is an assistant Opinion editor. He previously contributed as an opinion columnist for the section and writes about topics including the undergraduate student government and the UCLA administration.


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  • Mrs Emma P

    UCLA has a myriad of non-student visitors on campus every day who do not want to eat fast food and yet ASUCLA has spent the last decade or more removing cafeteria-style dining with real food options and replacing them with fast food. Students have great dorm options so there is little at Ackerman to induce them to leave the hill while alumni, staff, and visitors are pretty much forced to eat junk. Also, ASUCLA should look into adding services that could benefit both students and staff alike. Are there services that could be provided in Ackerman that students and staff must currently leave campus for? Would bringing these conveniences onsite be a way to serve the campus community and increase revenue? These questions should be asked and answered before turning the student union into franchise junk food haven.