Monday, February 18

UCLA researchers are studying neural circuits in worms to try to understand human decision-making in response to stimuli. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA study on worms lends insight into decision-making by people

Studying neural circuits in worms might give researchers insight into human decision-making, according to a paper published by UCLA researchers. Researchers in the lab of Elissa Hallem, a UCLA professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics, published a study in January on how chemical signaling molecules affect how worms behave when they are hungry. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers are studying neural circuits in worms to try to understand human decision-making in response to stimuli. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers are studying neural circuits in worms to try to understand human decision-making in response to stimuli. (Daily Bruin file photo)



Jerry Moss, co-founder of A&M Records, donated $1 million to UCLA's Moss Scholars program, which awards full-tuition scholarships to art and music students. The donation was a part of the UCLA Centennial Campaign. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

Record label founder donates $1 million for art and music school scholarships

A philanthropist donated $1 million to provide scholarships for art and music students, a university press release announced Thursday. Jerry Moss, who co-founded A&M Records with Herb Alpert, gifted the donation to UCLA’s Moss Scholars program, which has awarded full-tuition scholarships to art and music students for 15 years. Read more...

Photo: Jerry Moss, co-founder of A&M Records, donated $1 million to UCLA's Moss Scholars program, which awards full-tuition scholarships to art and music students. The donation was a part of the UCLA Centennial Campaign. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

Jerry Moss, co-founder of A&M Records, donated $1 million to UCLA's Moss Scholars program, which awards full-tuition scholarships to art and music students. The donation was a part of the UCLA Centennial Campaign. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)


An array of telescopes being constructed with the help of UCLA researchers will work as a system that allows researchers to study gamma rays in the sky with about 10 times more sensitivity than current telescopes. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

UCLA researchers improve scope of technology to help create gamma-ray observatory

UCLA researchers are helping construct the world’s largest and most sensitive gamma-ray observatory. The observatory, called the Cherenkov Telescope Array, will comprise 118 telescopes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, according to a university press release. Read more...

Photo: An array of telescopes being constructed with the help of UCLA researchers will work as a system that allows researchers to study gamma rays in the sky with about 10 times more sensitivity than current telescopes. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

An array of telescopes being constructed with the help of UCLA researchers will work as a system that allows researchers to study gamma rays in the sky with about 10 times more sensitivity than current telescopes. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

Dennis Slamon, director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program, won an award from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Sweden’s Sjöberg Foundation for his pioneering research in targeted breast cancer treatments. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

UCLA researcher awarded Sjöberg Prize for pioneering targeted breast cancer treatment

A UCLA researcher won an award for his efforts to target and treat breast cancer. Dennis Slamon, director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program, won the Sjöberg Prize from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Sweden’s Sjöberg Foundation. Read more...

Photo: Dennis Slamon, director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program, won an award from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Sweden’s Sjöberg Foundation for his pioneering research in targeted breast cancer treatments. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

Dennis Slamon, director of the Revlon/UCLA Women’s Cancer Research Program, won an award from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences and Sweden’s Sjöberg Foundation for his pioneering research in targeted breast cancer treatments. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)