Monday, July 22

Fourth-year biochemistry student Peter Yang directed "Strange Fodder," a film that is currently in pre-production. The film deals with escapism, following a protagonist who enters multiple realities after suffering a traumatic experience. (Courtesy of Peter Yang)

Student-made film shines a light on escapism and its consequences

Peter Yang wants to give students food for thought about escapism in his film “Strange Fodder.” The fourth-year biochemistry student’s film project stars fourth-year sociology student Daniel Vallejo, who mentally enters a series of new realities after experiencing an unspecified traumatic event. Read more...

Photo: Fourth-year biochemistry student Peter Yang directed "Strange Fodder," a film that is currently in pre-production. The film deals with escapism, following a protagonist who enters multiple realities after suffering a traumatic experience. (Courtesy of Peter Yang)

Fourth-year biochemistry student Peter Yang directed "Strange Fodder," a film that is currently in pre-production. The film deals with escapism, following a protagonist who enters multiple realities after suffering a traumatic experience. (Courtesy of Peter Yang)

Gerard Wong, a bioengineering professor, discovered the structure and role of the molecule LL-37 in the body’s immune system in an article on the study published in March. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Researchers identify molecule’s structure, role in autoimmune conditions

UCLA researchers found the structure of a molecule that can trigger the overactivation of the immune system in autoimmune diseases. Gerard Wong, a bioengineering professor, discovered the structure and role of the molecule LL-37 in the body’s immune system, according to an article on the study published in March. Read more...

Photo: Gerard Wong, a bioengineering professor, discovered the structure and role of the molecule LL-37 in the body’s immune system in an article on the study published in March. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Gerard Wong, a bioengineering professor, discovered the structure and role of the molecule LL-37 in the body’s immune system in an article on the study published in March. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Stanley Carmichael, the chair of the neurology department, and Alcino Silva, a psychology professor, found that blocking the function of the CCR5 gene leads to better cognitive and motor skill recovery after a stroke or traumatic brain injury. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Researchers discover gene suppressing stroke and brain injury recovery

UCLA researchers discovered that a gene could suppress stroke recovery and traumatic brain injury recovery. Stanley Carmichael, the chair of the neurology department, and Alcino Silva, a psychology professor, found that blocking the function of the CCR5 gene leads to better cognitive and motor skill recovery after a stroke or traumatic brain injury. Read more...

Photo: Stanley Carmichael, the chair of the neurology department, and Alcino Silva, a psychology professor, found that blocking the function of the CCR5 gene leads to better cognitive and motor skill recovery after a stroke or traumatic brain injury. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Stanley Carmichael, the chair of the neurology department, and Alcino Silva, a psychology professor, found that blocking the function of the CCR5 gene leads to better cognitive and motor skill recovery after a stroke or traumatic brain injury. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Third-year musical theater student Fernando Castro and third-year theater acting student
Romy Bavli will both perform in “The Liane Kazan Project,” which features performances from students in Kazan’s studio presentation class. 
 (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Students channel their own stories to refresh well-known songs for cabaret show

Lianie Kazan said songs are not just about speaking the lyrics – they’re about living them. The visiting associate theater professor teaches students how to infuse songs with authentic emotion in her studio presentation class. Read more...

Photo: Third-year musical theater student Fernando Castro and third-year theater acting student Romy Bavli will both perform in “The Liane Kazan Project,” which features performances from students in Kazan’s studio presentation class. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Third-year musical theater student Fernando Castro and third-year theater acting student
Romy Bavli will both perform in “The Liane Kazan Project,” which features performances from students in Kazan’s studio presentation class. 
 (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Audrey at the Hammer, which opened Feb. 26, offers European dishes on its menu as well as some casual diner fare. Overall, the restaurant fails to provide satisfactory contemporary dishes that live up to their inflated price tags. (Courtesy of Sean Ryan Pierce)

Restaurant review: Audrey’s variable dish quality fails to justify inflated prices

Audrey at the Hammer makes a visitor wish they stayed confined to the galleries of the museum. Located near the Hammer Museum’s Lindbrook entrance, Audrey, which opened Feb. Read more...

Photo: Audrey at the Hammer, which opened Feb. 26, offers European dishes on its menu as well as some casual diner fare. Overall, the restaurant fails to provide satisfactory contemporary dishes that live up to their inflated price tags. (Courtesy of Sean Ryan Pierce)

Audrey at the Hammer, which opened Feb. 26, offers European dishes on its menu as well as some casual diner fare. Overall, the restaurant fails to provide satisfactory contemporary dishes that live up to their inflated price tags. (Courtesy of Sean Ryan Pierce)

UCLA researchers found developing fruit flies exhibited activity in their innermost eye cells before they were able to open their eyes. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Fruit fly brain cells offer potential insight on human synapse formation

UCLA researchers discovered a pattern in fruit fly brain cells that might help explain how human brains make connections between their brain cells. Orkun Akin, an assistant professor of neurobiology, and Bryce Bajar, a graduate student and first author on the paper, found developing fruit flies exhibited activity in their innermost eye cells before they were able to open their eyes. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers found developing fruit flies exhibited activity in their innermost eye cells before they were able to open their eyes. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers found developing fruit flies exhibited activity in their innermost eye cells before they were able to open their eyes. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Six speakers, including one UCLA student, talked about their experiences with eating disorders and how they have each approached recovery at an event held by the Body Image Task Force and Project HEAL Tuesday. (Tabatha Lewis/Daily Bruin)

Panel members discuss ongoing experiences recovering from eating disorders

This post was updated Feb. 28 at 3:59 p.m. Elena Eu said recovery from her eating disorder wasn’t a finish line, but rather an ongoing journey at a panel Tuesday night. Read more...

Photo: Six speakers, including one UCLA student, talked about their experiences with eating disorders and how they have each approached recovery at an event held by the Body Image Task Force and Project HEAL Tuesday. (Tabatha Lewis/Daily Bruin)

Six speakers, including one UCLA student, talked about their experiences with eating disorders and how they have each approached recovery at an event held by the Body Image Task Force and Project HEAL Tuesday. (Tabatha Lewis/Daily Bruin)


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