Monday, August 19


L.A. Theatre Works put on a production of "Sisters Matsumoto," a play following three Japanese-American immigrants returning home after leaving an internment camp in Arkansas. This version of the production was altered to best suit being recorded for radio, with focus on creating distinct voices for each character. (Courtesy of Jeanne Sakata)

‘Matsumoto Sisters’ addresses relevant topics of immigration, discrimination

Anti-immigrant sentiment and family displacement aren’t just descriptors of Japanese internment in World War II. For director Tim Dang, they’re an eerie parallel to the politics of today, he said. Read more...

Photo: L.A. Theatre Works put on a production of "Sisters Matsumoto," a play following three Japanese-American immigrants returning home after leaving an internment camp in Arkansas. This version of the production was altered to best suit being recorded for radio, with focus on creating distinct voices for each character. (Courtesy of Jeanne Sakata)

L.A. Theatre Works put on a production of "Sisters Matsumoto," a play following three Japanese-American immigrants returning home after leaving an internment camp in Arkansas. This version of the production was altered to best suit being recorded for radio, with focus on creating distinct voices for each character. (Courtesy of Jeanne Sakata)


UCLA and LCC Theatre Company alumni took the stage at the Northwest Campus Auditorium to discuss Asian-American representation in the media. With the recent representation, especially the popularity of “Crazy Rich Asians," food stylist and culinary producer Janet Lo said she hopes it becomes more than just a trend. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Panel discusses rise of Asian-American visibility, continued need for progress

“Crazy Rich Asians” was the first film with an all-Asian cast and an Asian-American lead in 25 years. But the film breaking box office records is not necessarily indicative of a sea of change for Asian-American representation, said culinary producer and food stylist Janet Lo – it’s a step toward a larger conversation. Read more...

Photo: UCLA and LCC Theatre Company alumni took the stage at the Northwest Campus Auditorium to discuss Asian-American representation in the media. With the recent representation, especially the popularity of “Crazy Rich Asians," food stylist and culinary producer Janet Lo said she hopes it becomes more than just a trend. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

UCLA and LCC Theatre Company alumni took the stage at the Northwest Campus Auditorium to discuss Asian-American representation in the media. With the recent representation, especially the popularity of “Crazy Rich Asians," food stylist and culinary producer Janet Lo said she hopes it becomes more than just a trend. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Salia Sanou, the inaugural recipient of the Alma Hawkins Memorial Chair for UCLA's world arts and cultures/dance department, will present "Dancing Across Borders" on Thursday. Sanou plans to play videos at the event, perform a solo dance and deliver a short talk to share his perspective on the relationship between one's body and the world. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Dancer explores borders, colonization through multimedia performance

Salia Sanou said he is all too familiar with borders generated by colonizers and the impact they’ve had in the region. His knowledge of such man-made boundaries has guided his work as a dancer from Burkina Faso, using movement to explore the ideas of borders and territory, he said. Read more...

Photo: Salia Sanou, the inaugural recipient of the Alma Hawkins Memorial Chair for UCLA's world arts and cultures/dance department, will present "Dancing Across Borders" on Thursday. Sanou plans to play videos at the event, perform a solo dance and deliver a short talk to share his perspective on the relationship between one's body and the world. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Salia Sanou, the inaugural recipient of the Alma Hawkins Memorial Chair for UCLA's world arts and cultures/dance department, will present "Dancing Across Borders" on Thursday. Sanou plans to play videos at the event, perform a solo dance and deliver a short talk to share his perspective on the relationship between one's body and the world. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Alumna Angelica Chéri, who grew up hearing stories about her great-great-aunts, has created a musical based off their lives as outlaws. Excerpts from the musical will be featured at the National Alliance for Musical Theatre’s Festival of New Musicals in New York City. (Courtesy of B W Banks)

Family tales inspire alumna’s musical about white-passing, cultural identity

Angelica Chéri grew up listening to family stories about her great-great-aunts Mary and Martha Clarke – two white-passing African-American women rumored to have been outlaws in post-emancipation Texas. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Angelica Chéri, who grew up hearing stories about her great-great-aunts, has created a musical based off their lives as outlaws. Excerpts from the musical will be featured at the National Alliance for Musical Theatre’s Festival of New Musicals in New York City. (Courtesy of B W Banks)

Alumna Angelica Chéri, who grew up hearing stories about her great-great-aunts, has created a musical based off their lives as outlaws. Excerpts from the musical will be featured at the National Alliance for Musical Theatre’s Festival of New Musicals in New York City. (Courtesy of B W Banks)



1 2 3 4 5 19