Sunday, May 19

Alumna Angelica Chéri, who grew up hearing stories about her great-great-aunts, has created a musical based off their lives as outlaws. Excerpts from the musical will be featured at the National Alliance for Musical Theatre’s Festival of New Musicals in New York City. (Courtesy of B W Banks)

Family tales inspire alumna’s musical about white-passing, cultural identity

Angelica Chéri grew up listening to family stories about her great-great-aunts Mary and Martha Clarke – two white-passing African-American women rumored to have been outlaws in post-emancipation Texas. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Angelica Chéri, who grew up hearing stories about her great-great-aunts, has created a musical based off their lives as outlaws. Excerpts from the musical will be featured at the National Alliance for Musical Theatre’s Festival of New Musicals in New York City. (Courtesy of B W Banks)

Alumna Angelica Chéri, who grew up hearing stories about her great-great-aunts, has created a musical based off their lives as outlaws. Excerpts from the musical will be featured at the National Alliance for Musical Theatre’s Festival of New Musicals in New York City. (Courtesy of B W Banks)


Tim Chiou and Julia Cho star in “Two Mile Hollow,” a comedic parody meant to examine white privilege. Through casting Asian-American actors in stereotypically white roles, Chiou said they aim to debunk the preconceived notions of being a minority. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Comedic parody ‘Two Mile Hollow’ a challenging commentary on race, privilege

A rich, white family vacations in the Hamptons – but they’re portrayed by Asian-American actors. While “Two Mile Hollow” is a comedic parody, the play uses its casting to unpack and examine white privilege, while also creating roles for Asian actors. Read more...

Photo: Tim Chiou and Julia Cho star in “Two Mile Hollow,” a comedic parody meant to examine white privilege. Through casting Asian-American actors in stereotypically white roles, Chiou said they aim to debunk the preconceived notions of being a minority. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Tim Chiou and Julia Cho star in “Two Mile Hollow,” a comedic parody meant to examine white privilege. Through casting Asian-American actors in stereotypically white roles, Chiou said they aim to debunk the preconceived notions of being a minority. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)



Kris Wilson returned to his hometown in Pennsylvania to create his film “Smell of Summer,” which follows young African-American boys who witness a shooting. Wilson aimed to recreate his happy memories alongside the realities of prejudice. 
(Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff)

Alum travels back to his hometown for short film about childhood, trauma

The lead actor in Kris Wilson’s film wanted to know more about the backstory of his character. Wilson explained that his character Prince’s life was difficult in part because his father was in jail. Read more...

Photo: Kris Wilson returned to his hometown in Pennsylvania to create his film “Smell of Summer,” which follows young African-American boys who witness a shooting. Wilson aimed to recreate his happy memories alongside the realities of prejudice. (Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff)

Kris Wilson returned to his hometown in Pennsylvania to create his film “Smell of Summer,” which follows young African-American boys who witness a shooting. Wilson aimed to recreate his happy memories alongside the realities of prejudice. 
(Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff)

UCLA professor Pamela Hieronymi worked with Michael Schur, creator of NBC's "The Good Place," to integrate philosophy into his show. Her name is listed under "further reading" in "The Trolley Problem" episode.
(Photo courtesy of Gerard Vong)

Q&A: Professor discusses involvement in philosophical aspects of ‘The Good Place’

Sharp-eyed fans of “The Good Place” might notice the name of UCLA philosophy professor Pamela Hieronymi listed as “further reading” on a whiteboard in the episode “The Trolley Problem.” It’s not just a coincidence or a reference to her academic work – Hieronymi consulted on the show. Read more...

Photo: UCLA professor Pamela Hieronymi worked with Michael Schur, creator of NBC's "The Good Place," to integrate philosophy into his show. Her name is listed under "further reading" in "The Trolley Problem" episode. (Photo courtesy of Gerard Vong)

UCLA professor Pamela Hieronymi worked with Michael Schur, creator of NBC's "The Good Place," to integrate philosophy into his show. Her name is listed under "further reading" in "The Trolley Problem" episode.
(Photo courtesy of Gerard Vong)


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