Monday, November 18

"Hiro's Table," a documentary film by alumna Lynn Hamrick, chronicles 16 years in the life of Hiroji Obayashi and his wife Yasuyo Obayashi as they pioneered the farm-to-table Japanese food scene in Los Angeles. (Courtesy of Lynn Hamrick)

‘Hiro’s Table’ documents establishment of authentic Japanese restaurant in LA

“Hiro’s Table” follows a family coping with loss, success and the relentlessly fast-paced Los Angeles restaurant scene. UCLA alumna Lynn Hamrick directed, wrote and produced the documentary, which depicts master chef Hiroji Obayashi and his wife Yasuyo Obayashi over the course of 16 years as they pioneer a new restaurant model in LA: an authentic Japanese farm-to-table eatery called Hirozen Gourmet. Read more...

Photo: "Hiro's Table," a documentary film by alumna Lynn Hamrick, chronicles 16 years in the life of Hiroji Obayashi and his wife Yasuyo Obayashi as they pioneered the farm-to-table Japanese food scene in Los Angeles. (Courtesy of Lynn Hamrick)

"Hiro's Table," a documentary film by alumna Lynn Hamrick, chronicles 16 years in the life of Hiroji Obayashi and his wife Yasuyo Obayashi as they pioneered the farm-to-table Japanese food scene in Los Angeles. (Courtesy of Lynn Hamrick)

UCLA Extension student Bruna Cabral wanted to convey the importance of being patient with those who have Alzheimer's disease in her short film “Piece of Me.” The films follows an eight-year-old boy whose 80-year-old best friend begins to lose her memory due to the disease. Cabral said she wanted to juxtapose the innocence of a young child with an elderly character.
(Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

UCLA Extension student’s short film emphasizes optimistic outlook on Alzheimer’s

Every three seconds, someone develops Alzheimer’s disease – but Bruna Cabral is trying to find hope despite its negative impacts on millions of families. The UCLA Extension student’s short film follows an 8-year-old boy named Dylan (Mason Wells) whose 80-year-old best friend begins to lose her memory due to Alzheimer’s. Read more...

Photo: UCLA Extension student Bruna Cabral wanted to convey the importance of being patient with those who have Alzheimer's disease in her short film “Piece of Me.” The films follows an eight-year-old boy whose 80-year-old best friend begins to lose her memory due to the disease. Cabral said she wanted to juxtapose the innocence of a young child with an elderly character. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

UCLA Extension student Bruna Cabral wanted to convey the importance of being patient with those who have Alzheimer's disease in her short film “Piece of Me.” The films follows an eight-year-old boy whose 80-year-old best friend begins to lose her memory due to the disease. Cabral said she wanted to juxtapose the innocence of a young child with an elderly character.
(Amy Dixon/Photo editor)


Alumna Alice Fung gave a lecture Monday on her experience as an architect. Her designs aim to facilitate functionality and easy living, as well as appeal to clients' aesthetic preferences. (Courtesy of Alice Fung)

Alumna’s architecture integrates aesthetics with practical design

Architect Alice Fung doesn’t just design buildings; she tries to make life better for others through her work. The UCLA alumna is a practicing architect at Fung+Blatt Architects, a firm she founded with her husband, Michael Blatt. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Alice Fung gave a lecture Monday on her experience as an architect. Her designs aim to facilitate functionality and easy living, as well as appeal to clients' aesthetic preferences. (Courtesy of Alice Fung)

Alumna Alice Fung gave a lecture Monday on her experience as an architect. Her designs aim to facilitate functionality and easy living, as well as appeal to clients' aesthetic preferences. (Courtesy of Alice Fung)

The Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra performs without a conductor. The group uses other communicative methods in order to keep tempo and eliminated the common hierarchy of typical orchestras. (Courtesy of Benjamin Mitchell)

Conductorless orchestra trades hierarchical structure for collaboration

One. Two. Three. Four. What’s the tempo again? Los Angeles’ Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra must face the issue of synchronization without direction, because they have no conductor. Read more...

Photo: The Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra performs without a conductor. The group uses other communicative methods in order to keep tempo and eliminated the common hierarchy of typical orchestras. (Courtesy of Benjamin Mitchell)

The Kaleidoscope Chamber Orchestra performs without a conductor. The group uses other communicative methods in order to keep tempo and eliminated the common hierarchy of typical orchestras. (Courtesy of Benjamin Mitchell)