Monday, February 18

Shirley Tang, a first-year cognitive science student, performed at the Lunar New Year Festival on behalf of the Chinese Cultural Dance Club. The festival included performances from various student organizations on campus, where students danced, sang and engaged in other art forms, such as the Wushu martial art from China. (Jacqueline Gerdne/Daily Bruin)
Shirley Tang, a first-year cognitive science student, performed at the Lunar New Year Festival on behalf of the Chinese Cultural Dance Club. The festival included performances from various student organizations on campus, where students danced, sang and engaged in other art forms, such as the Wushu martial art from China. (Jacqueline Gerdne/Daily Bruin)

Asya Cook, resident director of Delta Terrace, organized the Geek Week event "A Night of Ice and Fire: a Game of Thrones Experience," where students will eat dinner while playing a "Game of Thrones"-based Mafia game. (Courtesy of Asya Cook)
Asya Cook, resident director of Delta Terrace, organized the Geek Week event "A Night of Ice and Fire: a Game of Thrones Experience," where students will eat dinner while playing a "Game of Thrones"-based Mafia game. (Courtesy of Asya Cook)

Matt Chait and Bruce Katzman (left to right), play Bertram Cates and Joshua Brownstein in "A Misunderstanding," respectively. In the production, Cates is suing the University of California for a wrongful dismissal lawsuit, and debates Brownstein, the UC head of biology, during the trial. (Courtesy of Ed Krieger)
Matt Chait and Bruce Katzman (left to right), play Bertram Cates and Joshua Brownstein in "A Misunderstanding," respectively. In the production, Cates is suing the University of California for a wrongful dismissal lawsuit, and debates Brownstein, the UC head of biology, during the trial. (Courtesy of Ed Krieger)

(Bridgette Baron/Daily Bruin)
(Bridgette Baron/Daily Bruin)

(Elysia Ouyang/Daily Bruin)
(Elysia Ouyang/Daily Bruin)

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Professor’s book explores intersectionality of ableism, race through fantasy

Blind demons, demigod twins and werewolves with OCD are referenced in Sami Schalk’s book about bodyminds. Bodymind, the concept of overlap of the body and mind and how they influence each other, is integral to Schalk’s book “Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction.” The work addresses how the idea of bodymind and categories of race, gender and disability are intertwined, arguing that disability studies can help scholars better understand black feminist theory, Schalk said. Read more...

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)
Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)


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