Monday, November 18

9 graduate students to pursue research internationally with Fulbright fellowship


Nine UCLA graduate students were selected for the prestigious Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowships. They will research abroad for six to 12 months in Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Columbia, Israel, Egypt, Japan, Korea, Ethiopia, Armenia, Hong Kong and China. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Nine UCLA graduate students were selected for the prestigious Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowships. They will research abroad for six to 12 months in Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Columbia, Israel, Egypt, Japan, Korea, Ethiopia, Armenia, Hong Kong and China. (Daily Bruin file photo)


Nine UCLA graduate students will get to research abroad after being awarded a prestigious fellowship from the federal government.

The Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program funds dissertation research in geography, history, culture, economy, politics, international relations and languages of a society or societies. Between 80 and 90 new recipients have been selected each year for the past seven years depending on the amount of funding available, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

The nine recipients are the largest number to come from UCLA since 2010, according to UCLA Newsroom. There were 12 UCLA recipients in 2010, according to the Department of Education.

Graduate students applied for the fellowship through the UCLA graduate division. The division then passed along eligible applicants to the Department of Education which administers the funds approved by Congress.

The 2019 UCLA recipients will research abroad for six to 12 months in Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Columbia, Israel, Egypt, Japan, South Korea, Ethiopia, Armenia, Hong Kong and China, according to UCLA Newsroom.

Jessica Bremner, an urban planning student, will study the relationship between housing policy and housing inequality in São Paulo, Brazil.

Andrea Gordillo, an education and information sciences student, will travel to Colombia, Mexico and Peru to study how three separate art collectives contribute to social transformation and justice.

Georgi Kyorlenski, an archaeology student, will research how the construction of monuments solidified the legitimacy of Incan rulers during civil wars in Peru.

Evan Metzger, a Near Eastern languages and cultures and Islamic studies student, will study the development of legal concepts in Israel and Egypt.

Asian languages and cultures student Maarika Rickansrud will travel to South Korea and Japan to research the transnational literary networks that existed between those two countries from the late 1940s to the 1980s.

Miranda Saylor, an art history student, will go to Mexico to study how female writers, namely King Philip IV’s advisor Sor María de Ágreda, influenced the depiction of sacred art in the Spanish empire.

David Spielman, a history student, will travel to Ethiopia to study the development of Christian legal culture in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Near Eastern languages and cultures student Anatolii Tokmantcev, will study the emergence of Jehovah’s Witnesses in post-Soviet Armenia.

Wan Yeung, an ethnomusicology student, will travel to Hong Kong and Guangzhou, China, to study how their divergent political influences manifest in their competitive expressions of Cantonese opera.

The fellowship is awarded every year. Deadlines for the next grant period are expected to be finalized in early winter.

 

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Bilbao is the Assistant News editor for City and Crime. He is a fourth-year political science student who previously worked as a News contributor for Features and Student Life.


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