Monday, October 21

4th UCLA student diagnosed with whooping cough, spread of infection ‘highly probable’


A UCLA student was diagnosed with whooping cough Wednesday, bringing the number of on-campus cases to four. The LADPH had previously notified the school of a third case – a resident of Sproul Cove – on Aug. 23. (Daily Bruin file photo)

A UCLA student was diagnosed with whooping cough Wednesday, bringing the number of on-campus cases to four. The LADPH had previously notified the school of a third case – a resident of Sproul Cove – on Aug. 23. (Daily Bruin file photo)


Another UCLA student was diagnosed with whooping cough Wednesday, bringing the total number of on-campus cases to four.

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a highly contagious respiratory disease. A student was diagnosed with whooping cough at the Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center on Aug. 28, according to an email statement from Administrative Vice Chancellor Michael Beck.

The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health also notified the school of a third case on Aug. 23. The student infected then was a resident of Sproul Cove, Beck said in an earlier statement sent to the Daily Bruin.

He added that the Ashe Center was working with UCLA Housing to email students living on the same floor to inform them of the exposure, and give them instructions to follow if they experience symptoms. Signage would also be placed in the lobby of the building, he said.

“Pertussis is an epidemic in LA County right now and it is highly probable there will be other students that will come down with it,” Beck said.

The disease is currently an epidemic in the LA County and it is highly probable there will be other students affected, Beck said.

“We continue to work closely with the medical staff at Ashe, the LA County Department of Public Health and infectious disease specialists at UCLA Health,” Beck said. “All are in agreement that the current efforts to mitigate further spread are appropriate.”

This follows a similar situation in May when an individual diagnosed with whooping cough was found to have spent time in Murphy Hall, prompting the LADPH to urge people who may have been exposed to get vaccinations.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, whooping cough begins with cold-like symptoms and a mild cough or fever. After one to two weeks, this may escalate to violent coughing fits resulting in vomiting and exhaustion. All incoming students are required to self-submit proof of receiving the whooping cough vaccine before registering for classes.

With fall quarter nearly three weeks away, the Ashe Center will be developing protocols with LADPH regarding the number of days students who are affected must refrain from attending classes, Beck said.

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Pant is the assistant News editor for Science and Health. She was previously a News contributor. Pant is a second-year economics student who enjoys writing about sustainability and public health.


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  • D_Mitchell

    There is a vaccine for this disease. https://www.cdc.gov/pertussis/vaccines.html Why is this not mentioned in the article?

    • Joe in Temecula

      From the UCLA website:
      “All newly-admitted incoming UCLA students must provide documentation of vaccination or immunity to certain infectious diseases (Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR), Varicella, Pertussis, and Meningitis).”

      So how is this happening?