Thursday, November 23

UC files motion to keep DACA operational during lawsuit review


The University of California and other groups have asked a federal judge to keep Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals operational until a final court ruling on the program.

The University of California and other groups have asked a federal judge to keep Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals operational until a final court ruling on the program.


The University of California and other groups suing President Donald Trump’s administration for ending Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals jointly filed a motion Wednesday asking a federal judge to keep the program operating while their lawsuits are being reviewed.

In September, Trump ended DACA, a program enacted by former-president Barack Obama in 2012 that deferred deportation for undocumented individuals brought to the United States as children. The UC and the state of California filed lawsuits in September against the Trump administration, claiming it was unconstitutional for the administration to end DACA.

The joint motion, which the UC filed with several groups, including California, Santa Clara county, San Jose and individual DACA recipients, asks the court to allow DACA to continue operating until a final court ruling.

The groups argue in the motion that the federal government rescission of DACA is unjust, unlawful and violates the Administrative Procedure Act, which requires the federal government to seek public comment when ending large programs like DACA.

William Alsup, the judge in the United States District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco, will hear oral arguments in the case on Dec. 20.

The UC, which has about 4,000 undocumented students, provides legal and counseling services to undocumented students and directs campus police officers not to work with federal agencies to enforce immigration law.

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News editor

Bharanidaran is the News editor. He was previously a news reporter for the campus politics beat, covering student government and the UCLA administration.


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  • Danny Francel

    DACA was an unconstitutional mandate. It has been rightfully rescinded.

  • Peter

    It was enacted by the president, so the president must have a full power to rescind it at any time.

  • tasam1

    Wording in article needs correcting. They are illegal aliens. In 2016 there were 251,000 students attending the UC school system. According to the article above about 4,000 are illegal aliens which is 1.6% of the total student body. Does UC require the rest of the student body to march and protest for the illegal aliens?

  • tyler cooper

    According to federal information, as a
    group 320,000 DACAs are not going to college. One hundred sixty
    thousand, 160,000, DACAs dropped out of school and have a ninth grade
    education. The other 160,000 DACAs finished high school or a GED but
    have no plans to go to college. News articles don’t provide this information, but it was provide at the congressional committee meeting.It is doubtful that the 160,000 minimally educated DACAs will pay much in taxes. Only about 60,000 DACAs have a four year or above college degree.

  • Charles Edward Brown

    NO AMNESTY and no deals for DACA criminals. We want our immigration laws enforced. President Trump should end DACA now and ICE should use the DACA database to arrest and deport DACA illegal aliens and their families. DACA is unconstitutional and asking a judge to enforce an unconstitutional Presidential decree