Friday, July 20

UCLA updates policy to remove student addresses from directory


The UCLA Registrar's Office announced that it will be updating the student records policy to remove student addresses from directory information. (Daily Bruin file photo)

The UCLA Registrar's Office announced that it will be updating the student records policy to remove student addresses from directory information. (Daily Bruin file photo)


UCLA is updating its student records policy to remove student addresses from the campus directory, university officials announced Monday.

The Registrar’s Office announced in a campuswide email it will update UCLA Policy 220, which concerns student records disclosures, in accordance with a University of California policy change last month. The UC removed both local and permanent student addresses from the directory information section of its policies governing campus activities, organizations and students. The UC made the change to protect students’ privacy, the Registrar said in the email.

The UC’s policies define directory information as information in a student record that would not harm students if disclosed, which includes students’ names, email addresses and telephone numbers.

UCLA Policy 220 is governed by the California Information Practices Act and the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, a federal law that protects the privacy of student education records.

Prior to this policy change, UCLA did not disclose addresses in the campus electronic directory unless the student authorized it, according to the Registrar.

Several students said they think the policy change will protect students’ privacy, but said the university should consider removing other personal information from the directory as well.

Alexa Payne, a third-year history student, said she thinks the policy change does not go far enough to protect students’ privacy because the directory still gives access to students’ emails.

Ana Drake-Tripp, a third-year sociology student, said she thinks the university should not make any personal information publicly available.

“I think emails and phone numbers are private information and shouldn’t be accessible,” she said.

 

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Kim is the assistant news editor for the campus politics beat. She was previously a contributor for the beat.


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  • Claire

    Good start but for a public directory, still exposes too much