Wednesday, November 14

Contract with union results in wage increase for skilled trades workers


Teamsters Local 2010, which represents UCLA skilled trades workers, had organized protests and strikes this past year calling for higher wages. UCLA and Teamsters agreed on a contract, which workers ratified on Monday. (Laura Uzes/Daily Bruin)

Teamsters Local 2010, which represents UCLA skilled trades workers, had organized protests and strikes this past year calling for higher wages. UCLA and Teamsters agreed on a contract, which workers ratified on Monday. (Laura Uzes/Daily Bruin)


UCLA and the union for campus skilled trades workers ratified a new five-year contract, university officials announced Thursday afternoon.

The 600 skilled trades workers will receive a 12.5-percent wage increase and 3-percent annual increases starting July 1. Employees hired on or before Oct. 16, 2012, will receive an additional $2,000 and non-probationary employees hired after that date will receive an additional $1,000.

The contract, which will last until June 2022, maintains a guaranteed defined benefit pension plan for all current and future employees and current medical plan options and benefit levels for the workers.

UCLA and Teamsters Local 2010, the union representing the workers, also settled an outstanding unfair practice charge and grievance.

Administrative Vice Chancellor Michael Beck, who oversees facilities management and housing and hospitality services, where most skilled trades employees work, said UCLA is pleased Teamsters and the university reached an agreement that recognizes employee contributions and reflects UCLA’s fiscal limitations.

Teamsters had been negotiating with UCLA for about seven months. Skilled trades workers had not received a pay raise since 2012. The union organized several protests and strikes in their calls for higher wages during negotiations.

UC and Teamsters recently reached a tentative agreement for a contract for about 12,000 clerical and administrative workers across the system.

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