Tuesday, September 18

Project Concern International holds fast to raise awareness for global hunger


Ashley Dittmar from Project Concern International spoke about the effects of world hunger to those gathered for the fasting event, which was intended to raise awareness and show solidarity for those suffering from hunger worldwide. (Alyssa Dorn/Daily Bruin)

Ashley Dittmar from Project Concern International spoke about the effects of world hunger to those gathered for the fasting event, which was intended to raise awareness and show solidarity for those suffering from hunger worldwide. (Alyssa Dorn/Daily Bruin)


A group of students fasted in solidarity with hungry peoples around the world at an event on the Hill on Sunday.

The event “Go Hungry for the Hungry” was co-sponsored by the UCLA branch of Project Concern International and UCLA Residential Life. About 40 people attended the eight-hour event in Rieber Hall’s Fireside Lounge.

The event aimed to educate people about hunger and included an optional eight-hour fast. Attendees listened to guest speakers, played carnival games and had a complimentary meal to end their fast at 10 p.m.

Suchi Amin, a third-year psychobiology student and a chairperson of the UCLA chapter of PCI, said though the club focuses on global health issues, they chose to focus particularly on the problem of malnutrition and hunger for the event because its worldwide impact is underrecognized.

The fasting component of the event was also meant to educate people about hunger in the LA area, Amin said.

“People don’t realize the extent of hunger and how much it can affect people,” said Laura Knittig, a first-year microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics student who attended the event.

Sean Corcoran, a fourth-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student who is the special events director for PCI, said students participating in the fast were able to experience the hunger some people go through on a daily basis.

The event also intended to inform students about the club’s cause.

“I wanted to raise awareness for myself and see how other people are experiencing different things,” said Sarah Erckenbrack, an executive member of the UCLA chapter of PCI and a first-year history student. “I want to be able to spread my knowledge across the community here at UCLA, and help people who can’t speak out for themselves.”

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Wright is the 2018-2019 assistant Blogging editor. She was previously a Quad contributor. She is a third-year communication student and likes to talk about coffee and surfing competitions.


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