It’s the beginning of the year, and the beginning of a brand new quarter and new classes to procrastinate for. As the days and nights remain chilly, it’s time to bundle up under a blanket and flip on the television as new episodes begin to air. Shows fortunate enough not to get the cut return from hiatus and may continue on to become new favorites. And with the new year come programs starting from page one. Here’s a guide to some of the shows coming to TV, Hulu and network websites. So make a cup of tea, sit down and enjoy a break from those studies.

FOX
“The Mindy Project”
Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m.

The project by “The Office” alum Mindy Kaling has taken off, adding to the many comediennes taking over comedy. Antics will continue to ensue in the life of ob-gyn Mindy Lahiri. In the next part of the season, Mindy continues to search for her romantic comedy-inspired dream man while juggling other unmanageable aspects of her life. Surrounding her is a cast of dysfunctional characters each with their own quirks, including the charming, sex-addicted British Dr. Jeremy Reed and the angrier Dr. Danny Castellano. The three doctors are partners in business with some romantic subtext. However, all the characters remain endearing. Because of largely positive critical reception and strong enough ratings, Fox renewed “The Mindy Project” for a second season.

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FOX

FOX
“The Following”
Mondays at 9 p.m.

One of the most hotly anticipated new shows of 2013, “The Following” tells the story of escaped serial killer, Joe Carroll, and the FBI agent who caught him. James Purefoy from HBO’s “Rome” co-stars as Carroll with Kevin Bacon as Ryan Hardy, the agent with a tortured past and alcoholism problem. Hardy is called back on the case eight years after it was first solved. The show looks gripping and psychologically thrilling as well as downright gross, such as in the killer’s obsession with eyes. The program takes interesting turns, tying the deaths to Edgar Allan Poe references (enticing for literary enthusiasts), and brings in the power of social media and its followers.

You Do It To Yourself

CBS

CBS
“Elementary”
Thursdays at 10 p.m.

Adding to the many adaptations of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes currently on the air and movie screens, “Elementary” raised many questions. One, casting Lucy Liu as Holmes’ partner Watson, and two, the dynamic between a female Watson and male Holmes. So far, the questions remain, and so does the show. Joan Watson proves to be a compelling character and the relationship between Holmes and Watson has avoided being a trite one based on sexual tension. Instead, the friendship of the two characters carries the show through its crime procedurals. With the addition of the spice of addiction recovery, “Elementary” may continue to be a Sherlock Holmes interpretation on its own two legs rather than following a trend. Ratings and reception look strong so far, and Elementary has a full 24 episode season for this year.

Do No Harm - Season Pilot

NBC

NBC
“Do No Harm”
Thursdays at 10 p.m.

“Do No Harm” deals with the classic tale of the two sides of a person, intellect and instinct. It’s a Jekyll and Hyde story with direct parallels to the original. Starring Steven Pasquale from “Rescue Me” as Dr. Jason Cole, “Do No Harm” tells the story of a neurosurgeon with a dark secret. He has an alternate ego, Ian Price, who engages in dangerous behaviors Cole would never commit himself. Cole must grapple with trying to control this ego, even as the serum he invented to do so starts to fail. The show poses the question: Will Cole be able to control Price, or will Price wreak such havoc that he destroys their lives?

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FX

FX
“The Americans”
Wednesdays at 10 p.m.

A new spy drama hits the cable network bringing new political intrigue. The show stars Keri Russell of “Felicity” and Matthew Rhys from ABC’s “Brothers and Sisters.” Russell and Rhys play a married couple with two children living in suburban America in the 1980s, but they have secretly come to the United States from Soviet Russia as KGB sleeper agents. They must complete their mission while adjusting to living in America. To make matters more complicated, their marriage is an arranged one for the sake of the assignment, but they have started to fall in love. Pitting their objectives against the life they build, the show looks to play up this conflict. It is a conflict that may prove to be enthralling.