Student Media changed the locks on the UCLA Radio station on Sept. 17, three days after students were found drinking in the station.

University police were notified on Sept. 14 around 9 p.m. of six people who were drinking alcohol inside the UCLA Radio station, Assistant Chief of Police Jeff Young said.

“No arrests were made,” Young said. “The students will be referred to Student Affairs where the appropriate disciplinary action will be taken.”

This incident is not the first for UCLA Radio, as two similar events have occurred since March, said UCLA Student Media Director Arvli Ward.

Erik Perez, former general manager of UCLA Radio, said two of the students involved were part of the radio station, whereas the rest of those present were their friends.

“The students involved with UCLA Radio have been suspended until otherwise decided,” Perez said.

Perez is not returning to UCLA as a student, and therefore he cannot be general manager any longer, Ward said. As a result, there has been no general manager for UCLA Radio since spring quarter ended.

Programming was offered over the summer, but programming for the regular year will not begin until a new general manager is selected, said David Blumenfeld, UCLA Radio assistant general manager.

Ward said without a general manager, the Communications Board could not make sure that incidents violating university policy would not occur, which led to the decision to close the station until a new general manager is selected.

“Since this has been a repeated issue, the ASUCLA Communications Board is stepping in to decide what course of action to take towards UCLA Radio as far as these drinking incidents,” Ward said. “However, the lack of a general manager at UCLA Radio has made it difficult.”

Ward said the board is accepting applications for a new UCLA Radio general manager and will meet Monday and select a new general manager if possible, but the process could continue into next month.

“We had a lot of new faces coming in spring quarter. It was really upsetting for them that we had this huge setback,” Blumenfeld said. “We’re supposed to hold ourselves to a high level of ethic and conduct in the station, and maybe we didn’t express that clearly.”