Tuesday, December 10

Letters


Letters

Dogma definition

Editor:

I was surprised to see some major inaccuracies in the Daily
Bruin article "Through religious eyes" (Feb. 8). Jennifer Louie
inaccurately reported that the Rev. Paul Dechant of the University
Catholic Center said that belief in three basic dogmas is all that
is necessary to be a Catholic Christian.

In correspondence with Dechant, I discovered that Louie did not
report Dechant’s insistence that belief in the articles of the
Nicene Creed are foremost in importance.

The three dogmas then accompany belief in the Creed. Further,
celibacy is not one of the three dogmas which Dechant mentioned. In
fact, celibacy is not a dogma at all! Louie perhaps meant to report
papal infallibility as one of the dogmas.

Although these errors may have happened accidentally, I hope for
better accuracy in reporting from The Bruin.

Anthony Garcias

Fourth-year

Philosophy and Latin

Rock on!

Editor:

I wanted to sincerely thank Aaron Howard for his great column on
black musical heritage in the United States ("Rock finds roots in
black history," Feb. 8). I feel it is safe to assume that all
popular music today can find its foundation in black music.

I had always assumed that this was common knowledge, but for
those who do not agree, the evidence is right there in early
recordings, folk spirituals and work songs of the slavery period
and beyond.

All pop musicians today are continually in debt to the black
originators of popular musical styles. I applaud Howard for his
insightful column. Keep up the good work!

Tim Roddy

Film studies

Art of hypocrisy?

Editor:

Charles Hall’s Kerckhoff Art Gallery exhibit, "this is not an
invitation to rape me," makes provocative use of common media
images of women and children to effectively confront issues of
sexual violence.

But, the Daily Bruin interview with the artist ("An invitation
to think," Feb. 8) made no mention of the fact that Hall is a
creative director at Chiat/Day, a well-known local advertising
agency whose clients have included NutraSweet, Redken, American
Express, Reebok and L.A. Gear.

I, for one, am curious to hear how he reconciles his own
feminist art with stereotypical images of women as fantasy objects
(sexual and otherwise) perpetuated in television and print ads
"created" by advertising agencies like Chiat/Day.

Jane Garcia

Fourth-year

Women’s studies/political science

Tree lover

Editor:

Congratulations should go to the campus architect Duke Oakley
and his colleagues for the placement of exceptional specimen trees
along Le Conte.

As chair of the Westwood Village Community Alliance’s Planning
and Design Committee, I see this action as a significant
contribution to the community.

We look forward to more wonderful contributions to the
community’s design by UCLA in the future.

Michael Bobrow

Design principal

Bobrow/Thomas and Associates

Sign this, buddy!

Editor:

Any student who has walked up Bruin Walk in the past few weeks
has certainly seen the multitude of individuals and organizations
who are circulating petitions to get statewide initiatives on the
November ballot.

While many of these petitions are for worthwhile causes, it is
crucial that each of us pay close attention to every petition we
sign.

This is particularly important because in the past week,
professional (nonstudent) petition-gatherers have been venturing
onto campus to obtain signatures for the so-called California Civil
Rights Initiative (which may be referred to by a variety of
misleading phrases such as "ending preferential treatment" or
"restricting quotas").

Campus faculty and student groups have been outspoken in support
of affirmative action programs, which for decades have provided
minority individuals with opportunities that they otherwise would
have been denied.

Students should be forewarned that those circulating the
anti-affirmative action petition realize the unpopularity of their
initiative on campus and are using deliberately deceitful
techniques in their hurried attempts to gather signatures for the
initiative.

I would urge students to carefully read the wording of each
initiative before they sign it. Realize that by signing a petition,
you are not merely helping to place it on the ballot. Your
signature also becomes an effective tool which advocates use to
show public support of the measure.

There are plenty of legitimate petitions circulated, and by all
means, sign those. But don’t let yourself be fooled by the
petitioners who are paid to do whatever is necessary to get the
anti-affirmative action initiative on the ballot.

Darrin Hurwitz

Third-year

Political scienceComments to [email protected]

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