Tuesday, May 21

Emeran Mayer, a professor at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at USC, received an $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism.  (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA, USC researchers study role of gut microbiome in development of autism

Researchers from UCLA and USC are researching the link between gut microbes and autism to better understand autism and its potential causes. Emeran Mayer, a professor of medicine, physiology, psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences at UCLA, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at University of Southern California, received a three-year $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism. Read more...

Emeran Mayer, a professor at UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine, and Lisa Aziz-Zadeh, an associate professor of psychology at USC, received an $808,000 grant from the United States Department of Defense to analyze gut microbiome abnormalities in patients with autism.  (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers are developing the first multiple sclerosis treatment that would target the disease's cause rather than only treating its symptoms. The study found that its symptoms could be alleviated with estriol treatments. Rhonda Voskuhl, the director of the UCLA Multiple Sclerosis Program and Clinic, led the study. (Courtesy of UCLA Health)
UCLA researchers are developing the first multiple sclerosis treatment that would target the disease's cause rather than only treating its symptoms. The study found that its symptoms could be alleviated with estriol treatments. Rhonda Voskuhl, the director of the UCLA Multiple Sclerosis Program and Clinic, led the study. (Courtesy of UCLA Health)

(Daily Bruin file photodaily bruin file photo
Government insurance programs pay a fixed rate for dialysis care. However, private insurance companies must negotiate with dialysis clinics on the price of treatment.

Study finds discrepancy in dialysis costs between private, government insurers

UCLA researchers found private insurers covering dialysis patients paid four times as much as government insurance programs for treatments, according to a study released Monday. The study, authored by researchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine and the Fielding School of Public Health, said government insurance programs pay an average of $248 per dialysis session, while private insurers pay an average of $1,041 per session. Read more...

(Daily Bruin file photodaily bruin file photo
Government insurance programs pay a fixed rate for dialysis care. However, private insurance companies must negotiate with dialysis clinics on the price of treatment.

Scientists will have to grapple with improving the taste and feasibility of growing food in space, speakers said at a panel Tuesday. The event was hosted by Science and Food, a UCLA nonprofit organization which aims to promote knowledge of food science, as part of its annual speaker series. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)
Scientists will have to grapple with improving the taste and feasibility of growing food in space, speakers said at a panel Tuesday. The event was hosted by Science and Food, a UCLA nonprofit organization which aims to promote knowledge of food science, as part of its annual speaker series. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

(Claire Sun/Daily Bruin)
(Claire Sun/Daily Bruin)

The UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center held a measles vaccination fair Tuesday. (Daily Bruin file photo)
The UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center held a measles vaccination fair Tuesday. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers received a grant from the National Institute of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse to find ways to incentivize people to quit smoking. The research will focus on promoting sustained abstinence from smoking and improving quality of life for smokers. (Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

UCLA team receives grant to research financial motivators to quit smoking

A UCLA-led team of researchers received $3.4 million to find ways of financially incentivizing people to quit smoking, a university press release announced Friday. The National Institutes of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse, which aims to promote research on drug use and its impact on public health, awarded researchers a five-year grant to study how financial incentives can help end smoking addiction. Read more...

UCLA researchers received a grant from the National Institute of Health’s National Institute on Drug Abuse to find ways to incentivize people to quit smoking. The research will focus on promoting sustained abstinence from smoking and improving quality of life for smokers. (Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)


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