Saturday, October 20

Halo-halo, a Filipino dessert, is served at B Sweet Dessert Bar and contains 13 different ingredients, including jackfruit and sweet beans. The vibrant layers of the dessert are blended together – halo-halo translates to "mix-mix" in Tagalog, the store's manager said. (Michael Zshornack/Daily Bruin senior staff)
Halo-halo, a Filipino dessert, is served at B Sweet Dessert Bar and contains 13 different ingredients, including jackfruit and sweet beans. The vibrant layers of the dessert are blended together – halo-halo translates to "mix-mix" in Tagalog, the store's manager said. (Michael Zshornack/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)
Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Professor’s book explores intersectionality of ableism, race through fantasy

Blind demons, demigod twins and werewolves with OCD are referenced in Sami Schalk’s book about bodyminds. Bodymind, the concept of overlap of the body and mind and how they influence each other, is integral to Schalk’s book “Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction.” The work addresses how the idea of bodymind and categories of race, gender and disability are intertwined, arguing that disability studies can help scholars better understand black feminist theory, Schalk said. Read more...

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)
Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)

The Radical Publishing Weekend will include an exhibition in the Fowler Musuem titled "South of No North." The blown-up photographs and artwork from books of independent publishing company Gate Negro Ediciones will be featured on the walls of the building's interior. (Courtesy of Sebastian Clough)
The Radical Publishing Weekend will include an exhibition in the Fowler Musuem titled "South of No North." The blown-up photographs and artwork from books of independent publishing company Gate Negro Ediciones will be featured on the walls of the building's interior. (Courtesy of Sebastian Clough)

Milk Tavern, a dessert shop in Koreatown, is known for its often daring combinations of ice cream and cereal. Patrons can create their own combinations, choosing from a variety of cereals stocked in dispensers along a wall. (Rachel Lee/Daily Bruin senior staff)
Milk Tavern, a dessert shop in Koreatown, is known for its often daring combinations of ice cream and cereal. Patrons can create their own combinations, choosing from a variety of cereals stocked in dispensers along a wall. (Rachel Lee/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Peter Asco teaches tai chi to UCLA staff and faculty through the FITWELL program, and also to students at the John Wooden Center Fowler Museum’s courtyard. His next free class, open to the public, will take place Friday at 11 a.m. in Fowler Museum’s Davis Courtyard. (Rachel Lee/Daily Bruin senior staff)
Peter Asco teaches tai chi to UCLA staff and faculty through the FITWELL program, and also to students at the John Wooden Center Fowler Museum’s courtyard. His next free class, open to the public, will take place Friday at 11 a.m. in Fowler Museum’s Davis Courtyard. (Rachel Lee/Daily Bruin senior staff)


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