Friday, May 29

Film editor with work in renowned films honored by Motion Picture Editors Guild

Looking back at almost 40 years of work in the entertainment industry, Martin Cohen said there is nothing he would change. From working on the “The Hunger Games” to “Schindler’s List,” Cohen said his time has allowed him to forge long-lasting relationships within the industry. Read more...

Photo: Martin Cohen received the 2019 Motion Picture Editors Guild Fellowship and Service Award on Saturday night at the Sheraton Universal Hotel in Universal City, California. Cohen has worked on films ranging from “Schindler’s List” to “Gladiator.” (Courtesy of Martin Cohen)


Bill that could give UC system $2 billion added to March ballot

A bond on the March ballot would provide $2 billion to the University of California. Assembly Bill 40, which was approved by the California Legislature on Sept. Read more...

Photo: Assembly Bill 48 would allocate one-time funds of $15 billion to the California public school system if passed on the March ballot. UC President Janet Napolitano said in a statement that the bond would help modernize equipment and facilities at all California public schools. (Daily Bruin file photo)


‘The Big Bang Theory’ sets take the stage on Warner Bros. tour after show’s end

This post was updated July 1 at 2:00 p.m. New sets will arrive with a bang on the Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood. Beginning June 28, “The Big Bang Theory” stage, “Stage 25,” joined the company’s studio tour, allowing fans to experience backdrops like Apartment 4A and the California Institute of Technology Physics Department cafeteria. Read more...

Photo: “The Big Bang Theory” sets are being added to the Warner Bros. Studio Tour Hollywood, and Steve Holland, the show’s writer and co-producer, predicts that Sheldon’s seat on the couch will be a well-worn spot. (Tanmay Shankar/Assistant Photo editor)


Dance duo makes social discourse accessible through movement

Jon Boogz and Lil Buck established Movement Art Is in 2016 with just one mission – to inspire change through dance. The dance group uses movement artistry to voice its concerns about social issues like mass incarceration and racial injustice, Boogz said. Read more...

Photo: Jon Boogz and Lil Buck will perform “Love Heals All Wounds” in Royce Hall on Thursday. The duo founded Movement Art Is, a group that uses movement to comment on social issues, such as racial injustice. (Courtesy of Ney Coelho)


Columbia professor discusses issues involving refugees, asylum seekers

This post was updated on May 17 at 5:36 p.m. A Columbia University professor said Americans should show greater compassion toward refugees and asylum seekers coming to the United States at an event on campus Wednesday. Read more...

Photo: Mae Ngai, a history and Asian American studies professor at Columbia University, gave a lecture at UCLA Wednesday about the history of refugees and asylum seekers in the United States and around the world. The lecture is a part of a two-part series on asylum and deportation. (Tess Horowitz/Daily Bruin)


Dan Navarro discusses growth in music career starting with his time at UCLA

Dan Navarro, a UCLA alumnus, returned to campus in 2005 for a guest appearance after kicking off his music career. At the end of the class, students formed a line that stretched to the back door of the lecture hall waiting to talk to him, said Peter Rutenberg, Navarro’s longtime friend. Read more...

Photo: Alumnus Dan Navarro has written songs for Pat Benatar, The Bangles, TKA, Jackson Browne and The Temptations. Outside the music industry, he also voiced various animated characters on television shows including “American Dad!” and “Family Guy.” Navarro performed Saturday at the Fiddlers Crossing in Tehachapi, California. (Emily Ng/Daily Bruin)


Societal expectations, familial preferences worsen girls’ performances in STEM

Parents’ preference for boys may negatively impact their daughters’ test scores, according to a recent study. Researchers from UCLA, Northwestern University and the London School of Economics found American families prefer the birth of boys over girls, which in turn lowers girls’ test scores in math and science. Read more...

Photo: Paolo Giuliano, a UCLA economics professor, authored a paper with researchers at Northwestern and the London School of Economics that found American parents’ preference for the birth of boys lowers girls’ test scores in math and science. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)