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Daily Bruin Abroad: Hong Kong

By Lauren Man

October 10, 2019 4:30 pm

The commercial signs cast a purple-pink glow on the rainwater-covered grounds of Causeway Bay, one of Hong Kong’s busiest shopping areas.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Tai Kwun, also known as the former Central Police Station compound, includes the former Central Police Station, Central Magistracy and Victoria Prison from Hong Kong’s colonial past. It was revitalized as a new center for educating visitors on Hong Kong’s heritage as well as hosting other art exhibitions.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Dragonfly is a bar and restaurant located inside the Tai Kwun compound. It was inspired by the art nouveau movement, which coincides with the period in which Tai Kwun was built.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Red Incense Burner Summit overlooks a hazy Victoria Harbour, with the shoreline of Hong Kong Island on the left and Kowloon on the right.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Although many think of Hong Kong as a singular concrete jungle, its hilly topography actually hides a lot of hiking trails. The Tai To Yan trail is one of them. ''Tai To Yan'' translates to ''big knife’s edge'' in Cantonese, metaphorically referencing the sharp mountain ridge on part of the trail.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

The lush fengshui woods in Lam Tsuen Country Park reside beneath the Tai To Yan trail. Fengshui woods are pieces of woodland behind indigenous villages that are thought to offer protection to the residents, who in turn guard these forests. Thus, these are some of the most intact native ecosystems in Hong Kong.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

A water monitor lizard swims in its tank in Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden. The farm and garden spreads over the northern slopes of Hong Kong’s highest mountain, Tai Mo Shan.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Cape D’Aguilar is the southeastern-most tip of Hong Kong Island. It is famous for its geological formations, such as the Crab Cave in the picture, named for its supposedly crablike arch.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Protestors surround the Hong Kong Police Headquarters on June 21, protesting police use of excessive force during the largely peaceful mass protests of the month.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Protestors surge through the streets Aug. 31. This is an important date for the Hong Kong democracy movement, as five years ago on this date, the Chinese government declined to implement full universal suffrage. This was one of many weekend protests this summer.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Two residents of a public housing estate lounge under the shade of banyan trees. The majority of housing in Hong Kong is in the form of cramped apartments in tower blocks, with almost half of them being public housing.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

K11 Musea is a new luxury shopping complex that proclaims itself to be the ''Silicon Valley of Culture.'' Art installations are interspersed between the stores, and outdoor rooftop gardens offer a place for shoppers to breathe.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

The Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery, located on a hillside in Pai Tau Village, actually displays nearly 13,000 Buddha statues.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Hong Kong is home to the Hong Kong UNESCO Global Geopark, located in the northeastern district of Sai Kung, which contains special geological features. This cliff face primarily features hexagonal rock columns.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Sheung Luk Stream is a popular cliff-jumping spot, with rock pools and waterfalls.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Rain falls at the Aberdeen Reservoirs, one of the 41 pre-World War II waterworks structures in Hong Kong given monument status.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

Before Hong Kong was turned into a transshipment port by British colonizers, it was a small fishing village. This is a modern Hong Kong fish farm, floating in the calm waters of Three Fathoms Cove.

(Lauren Man/Daily Bruin)

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Lauren Man | Assistant Photo editor
Man is the incoming Assistant Photo editor on the news beat and second-year marine biology student. She also contributes to News and has written for PRIME.
Man is the incoming Assistant Photo editor on the news beat and second-year marine biology student. She also contributes to News and has written for PRIME.
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