September apparently brings 113-degree temperatures this year, but also the usual bounty of new TV shows. Daily Bruin A&E reviewed some of the pilot episodes and gave them a letter grade. Read on to see which ones we think are worth watching, and which ones are probably going to be canceled before the season’s over.
*“Raising Hope”*
*FOX*
*Tuesdays 9 p.m.*
*Grade: A*Princess Beyoncé just might be the greatest baby name ever. But being christened with such an epic name could not have prepared the six-month-old for the events of the hilariously memorable pilot episode of “Raising Hope.” After her mother, a convicted murderer, takes a trip to the electric chair, Beyoncé is left with her endearing but clueless 20-something father (Lucas Neff). Between being wheeled around in a shopping cart, riding in a car seat that isn’t attached to the car and being thrown up on during changing time, it’s a rough first couple days. But the underlying warmth and avoidance of relying too much on redneck humor makes this story both funny and endearing, not to mention worth tuning into each week.

_– Samantha Suchland_

*“Hellcats”*
*The CW*
*Wednesdays 9 p.m.*
*Grade: D-*“Bring it On,” “Bring it on Again,” “Bring it on: All or Nothing,” “Bring it on: In it to win It” and “Bring it on: Fight to the Finish” were clearly not enough. Now, cheerleading drama can be viewed weekly, with ex-Disney Channel stars. Alyson Michalka plays Marti Perkins, a pre-law student at Lancer University in Memphis who loses her scholarship in her last semester. I’m not sure how, but joining the notorious cheerleading squad, led by Savannah Monroe (Ashley Tisdale), means getting her scholarship back, with lots of drama involved. The plot is highly predictable, and the acting is subpar, but if you stomached the “Bring it On” series, maybe this show can entertain your hardened TV appetite.

_– Maryia Krivoruchko_

*“Better with You”*
*ABC*
*Wednesdays 8:30 p.m.*
*Grade: B *A surprisingly cute sitcom about three different couples – one married for 35 years, one dating for nine years and one engaged after dating for only seven weeks – “Better with You” is enjoyable if not groundbreaking. The engagement of Mia (Joanna Garcia) and Casey (Jake Lacy) is shocking to the other couples and causes some unexpected drama, which is also surprisingly delightful to watch.

_– Maryia Krivoruchko_

*“Blue Bloods”*
*CBS *
*Fridays 10 p.m.*
*Grade: B *

“Blue Bloods” is a well-balanced drama equipped with a nice dose of adrenaline, family tension and promise of interspersed romantic conflict. Set in New York City, the show follows the Reagan family – headed by New York City Police Commissioner Frank Reagan (Tom Selleck) – in the trials both on and off the job in a family dedicated to law enforcement. Sibling rivalry and overarching family unity make up the show’s premise as the family copes with the recent loss of a brother killed in the line of duty, paired with their daily commitment to protecting the lives of New York City residents. The show exhibits plenty of promise, but will need to keep up the nice mix of crime-filled action and family drama to stay interesting.

_– Lauren Roberts_

*“Outsourced”*
*NBC*
*Thursdays 9:30 p.m.*
*Grade: B*A young salesman (Ben Rappaport) is sent to India to manage an outsourced call center for a company selling American novelties – the premise almost guarantees a shameful, racist mess. But in NBC’s new workplace comedy, the joke is as often on us as it is on the Indian telemarketers unfamiliar with a mistletoe belt buckle; the show’s villain, clearly established as such, is a stereotype of American insensitivity who imports processed cheese for his lunches. It’s not going to fill the void entirely when Steve Carell leaves “The Office,” but it should be good for consistent laughs – and hey, we might just learn something about the rest of the world.

_– Alex Goodman_

*“Lone Star”*
*FOX*
*Saturdays 11 p.m.*
*Grade: B-*Fans of “Catch Me If You Can” may enjoy this story of Robert Allen (James Wolk), a con man leading a double life who decides he’s done with the scamming but not the bigamy. Wolk has enough squeaky-clean charisma to charm while he cheats, but the show’s premise may prove to be too ambitious. Keeping two wives from finding out about each other is complicated enough; throw in a conniving brother-in-law at Allen’s new legitimate job, a cover-up of his previous cons and a hovering father who wants to keep Allen from going straight, and “Lone Star” could get tangled up in this web of lies.

_– Alex Goodman_

*“Nikita”*
*The CW*
*Thursdays at 9 p.m.*
*Grade: A-*For too long, audiences have been forced to choose between the absurd melodrama of “Gossip Girl” and the awesome spy action of “Burn Notice.” It is time to rejoice, then, in “Nikita,” starring Maggie Q as a super-secret agent who escapes from her corrupt government agency and plots to destroy them. Realism in your shows, stay away; otherwise, sit back and enjoy this thrilling ode to female empowerment. And if that isn’t enough, throw in Shane West, the heartthrob of “A Walk to Remember,” playing Nikita’s rival with a Christian Bale growl.

_– Alex Goodman_

*“The Whole Truth”*
*ABC*
*Wednesdays 10 p.m.*
*Grade: B-*Although buried beneath overdramatic music, unfunny quips and stereotypes galore, “The Whole Truth” is surprisingly watchable. Its twist is the presentation of both sides of the case, prosecution and defense. It makes sure to hammer this home with sudden overdramatic shifts to black and white as the storyline changes gears to the other side of the case. Even so, the show’s gimmick works, making the guilt of the actual suspect secondary to the excitement of which side will find the next clue first. If you’re a crime buff, this might whet your appetite for a while, but until the dialogue becomes less corny, “The Whole Truth” isn’t yet wholly satisfying.

_– Lauren Roberts_

*“Chase”*
*NBC*
*Mondays 10 p.m.*
*Grade: B-*Let’s be upfront: “Chase” is nothing we haven’t already seen before. There’s the tough-as-nails female lead, the quirky sidekicks who alternate between witty banter and witty comments on the criminal’s motives, and a rotating cast of bad guys. To top it off, the female lead, Annie Frost (Kelli Giddish), has a secret past that may or may not have to do with daddy issues and familial insecurity. But that’s not to say the show is without merit. It’s not original, but no one watches a cop drama to be wowed by a visionary new interpretation of the genre. More often than not, we just hope they’ll catch the bad guy.

_– Arit John_

*“Mike & Molly”*
*CBS*
*Mondays 9:30 p.m.*
*Grade: C*On the surface, “Mike & Molly” appears to have the recipe for a good comedy. Quirky couple in the making Mike Biggs (Billy Gardell), a Chicago police officer, and Molly Flynn (Melissa McCarthy), a fourth-grade teacher, are endearing as awkward members of their local Overeaters Anonymous support group. Supporting cast members Officer Carl McMillan (Reno Wilson), Mike’s love-advice-bearing police partner, and Molly’s flirtatious, thin sister Victoria (Katy Mixon) and equally thin mother Joyce (Swoosie Kurtz) are annoying at best, serving wisecracks and cliches on weight as easily as the local diner’s waiter (Nyambi Nyambi) serves malts and sandwiches. There is an underlying charm in the chemistry between Mike and Molly’s budding relationship, but the plot is predictable and short on genuine laughs.

_– Lauren Roberts_

*“Hawaii Five-0”*
*CBS*
*Mondays 10 p.m.*
*Grade: B*The current incarnation of “Hawaii Five-O” ran the risk of being just another version of the now ubiquitous, often indistinguishable crime dramas that overcrowd network television. Luckily, the pilot largely avoids turning the remake into “CSI: Hawaii.” Rather, viewers are treated to an enjoyable 40 minutes of television, bolstered by fast-paced but easy-to-follow action sequences and an understated comedic performance from Scott Caan as sidekick Danny “Danno” Williams. Yet Caan’s charisma only serves to highlight one of the show’s few blemishes – lead actor Alex O’Loughlin’s slightly robotic performance. Still, “Hawaii Five-0” plays like the TV equivalent of a good summer blockbuster – that is to say, it’s slightly forgettable, but inarguably entertaining.

_– Jeremy Lu_

*“The Defenders”*
*CBS *
*Wednesdays 10 p.m.*
*Grade: C*Set in Las Vegas, the ultimate city of indulgence, “The Defenders” tries to have it both ways. The story of Pete Kaczmarek (Jerry O’Connell) and Nick Morelli (Jim Belushi), two hard-partying attorneys in Sin City, wants desperately to be both a sexy, snarky comedy-drama and a serious legal procedural. It ends up falling flat on both counts: O’Connell and Belushi seem either sleazy or lame when dealing with their personal lives, and disingenuous when fighting for their clients in court. There’s no reason legal dramas can’t have a little fun, but this isn’t the way to do it.

_– Alex Goodman_

*“Detroit 1-8-7”*
*ABC*
*Tuesdays 10 p.m.*
*Grade: B *In an era of celebrity detectives with gimmicky super-abilities, “Detroit 1-8-7” is an unabashed cop show with no need for bells and whistles. It’s maybe the best candidate to pick up the baton of gritty realism left by “The Wire,” set in a city as ravaged by the recession as any in the country. Leading the charge is Michael Imperioli, known for his turn as Christopher Moltisanti on “The Sopranos,” here playing the moody and mysterious Detective Louis Fitch. If his co-stars can match his intrigue and intelligence, things could look promising for the Motor City.

_– Alex Goodman_