Friday, January 20








The California Supreme Court declared the death penalty unconstitutional in 1972, although that decision was later overturned. California voters had a chance to ban the death penalty last year, but they instead voted to hasten the process. (Creative Commons photo by Coolcaesar via Wikimedia Commons)

Aaron Julian: Californians must challenge ideological inconsistency shown in Prop. 66

California, a blue state that leads by example on most progressive policies, went red this past election cycle on an important issue. Somehow, the values of the Democratic Party and progressives alike proved baseless when the liberal populace of California voted not only to keep the death penalty via Proposition 66, but also chose to shorten the length of the appeals process from what could be decades to only a few years. Read more...

Photo: The California Supreme Court declared the death penalty unconstitutional in 1972, although that decision was later overturned. California voters had a chance to ban the death penalty last year, but they instead voted to hasten the process. (Creative Commons photo by Coolcaesar via Wikimedia Commons)

The California Supreme Court declared the death penalty unconstitutional in 1972, although that decision was later overturned. California voters had a chance to ban the death penalty last year, but they instead voted to hasten the process. (Creative Commons photo by Coolcaesar via Wikimedia Commons)