Wednesday, December 12

James Enstrom, a former UCLA professor who claims he was wrongly terminated because of his controversial position on certain air pollutants, was nominated to the Science Advisory Board. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA-affiliated professors nominated for EPA Scientific Advisory Board

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency nominated a former UCLA professor as a candidate for its Science Advisory Board. He claims he was wrongfully terminated because of his controversial position on certain air pollutants. Read more...

Photo: James Enstrom, a former UCLA professor who claims he was wrongly terminated because of his controversial position on certain air pollutants, was nominated to the Science Advisory Board. (Daily Bruin file photo)

James Enstrom, a former UCLA professor who claims he was wrongly terminated because of his controversial position on certain air pollutants, was nominated to the Science Advisory Board. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Emergency room doctors have seen numerous patients with minor injuries, such as sprains or fractures, as well as more serious injuries caused by e-scooters since their arrival in Westwood. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Injuries from electric scooter accidents surge while regulations are loosened

Emergency room doctors have seen an increase in scooter injuries as electric scooter use has increased in Westwood over the past few months. Mark Morocco, a faculty attending physician in the emergency department of the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, said he has seen numerous patients with minor injuries, such as sprains or fractures, as well as more serious injuries caused by e-scooters since their arrival in Westwood in January. Read more...

Photo: Emergency room doctors have seen numerous patients with minor injuries, such as sprains or fractures, as well as more serious injuries caused by e-scooters since their arrival in Westwood. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Emergency room doctors have seen numerous patients with minor injuries, such as sprains or fractures, as well as more serious injuries caused by e-scooters since their arrival in Westwood. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Alumnus Brent Wisner said Dewayne Johnson regularly used Roundup while working as a groundskeeper for Benicia Unified School District. He received a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma after two years of regular exposure. (Courtesy of Todd Cheney)

Alum wins lawsuit against Monsanto for hiding side effects of pesticides

This post was updated Nov. 8 at 10:14 a.m. A UCLA alumnus helped win a lawsuit against agrochemical and agricultural biotechnology company Monsanto, whose herbicide Roundup has been linked to cancer cases throughout the United States. Read more...

Photo: Alumnus Brent Wisner said Dewayne Johnson regularly used Roundup while working as a groundskeeper for Benicia Unified School District. He received a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma after two years of regular exposure. (Courtesy of Todd Cheney)

Alumnus Brent Wisner said Dewayne Johnson regularly used Roundup while working as a groundskeeper for Benicia Unified School District. He received a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma after two years of regular exposure. (Courtesy of Todd Cheney)


UCLA will create three new graduate student fellowships with a $1.5 million gift from the Julian Schwinger Foundation for Physics Research. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

UCLA physics and astronomy will create three new fellowships with $1.5M donation

UCLA will create three new graduate student fellowships with a $1.5 million gift from the Julian Schwinger Foundation for Physics Research. Graduate students in the Department of Physics and Astronomy are eligible to receive the fellowship. Read more...

Photo: UCLA will create three new graduate student fellowships with a $1.5 million gift from the Julian Schwinger Foundation for Physics Research. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

UCLA will create three new graduate student fellowships with a $1.5 million gift from the Julian Schwinger Foundation for Physics Research. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

Reconstructions of the skulls of two species of sabertooth cats. (Courtesy of Stephan Lautenschlager)

CAT scans of sabertooth cats’ skulls unearth evolution of predatory behavior

Some sabertooth cats had powerful skulls that allowed them to kill their prey in one or two bites, according to research published at UCLA. A UCLA professor, along with a team of international researchers, published a study in October that analyzed sabertooth cat skulls from two different species to determine how the cats killed their prey. Read more...

Photo: Reconstructions of the skulls of two species of sabertooth cats. (Courtesy of Stephan Lautenschlager)

Reconstructions of the skulls of two species of sabertooth cats. (Courtesy of Stephan Lautenschlager)



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