Wednesday, February 21

A panel of experts in sustainable energy and policy talked about the role of research, citizens and local community organizations to push for renewable energy resources at an event Wednesday night. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Experts discuss potential for complete transition to renewable energy

At an event Wednesday, experts said it is possible for California to achieve 100 percent renewable energy. “A lot of policies are driving initial investment of renewable energy in California, and demand is driving the rest,” said Kelly Trumbull, a researcher at the UCLA Luskin Center for Innovation. Read more...

Photo: A panel of experts in sustainable energy and policy talked about the role of research, citizens and local community organizations to push for renewable energy resources at an event Wednesday night. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

A panel of experts in sustainable energy and policy talked about the role of research, citizens and local community organizations to push for renewable energy resources at an event Wednesday night. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Miryung Kim, an associate professor in computer science, said the Mommy Computer Science Camp was inspired by the curiosity of her 4-year-old daughter. The weeklong camp teaches computer science concepts to preschool children without the actual use of computers. (Daniel Miller/Daily Bruin)

Associate professor runs computer science camp for preschoolers, parents

An associate professor at UCLA uses blocks, buckets and colorful owls to teach preschool students computer science. Miryung Kim, an associate professor of computer science, began Mommy Computer Science Camp at the UCLA Lab School in July. Read more...

Photo: Miryung Kim, an associate professor in computer science, said the Mommy Computer Science Camp was inspired by the curiosity of her 4-year-old daughter. The weeklong camp teaches computer science concepts to preschool children without the actual use of computers. (Daniel Miller/Daily Bruin)

Miryung Kim, an associate professor in computer science, said the Mommy Computer Science Camp was inspired by the curiosity of her 4-year-old daughter. The weeklong camp teaches computer science concepts to preschool children without the actual use of computers. (Daniel Miller/Daily Bruin)

Leonard Marks, a members of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Shyam Natarajan, a professor of urology received a $3.1 million grant to develop a new technology to treat prostate cancer. (Michael Zshornack/Photo editor)

Prostate cancer researchers receive grant, continue tech development

Two UCLA researchers received a $3.1 million grant to develop a new technology to treat prostate cancer. The National Institutes of Health awarded a grant to Leonard Marks, a professor of urology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and Shyam Natarajan, an adjunct assistant professor of urology, surgery and bioengineering at the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, to support their five-year research in prostate cancer. Read more...

Photo: Leonard Marks, a members of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Shyam Natarajan, a professor of urology received a $3.1 million grant to develop a new technology to treat prostate cancer. (Michael Zshornack/Photo editor)

Leonard Marks, a members of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center and Shyam Natarajan, a professor of urology received a $3.1 million grant to develop a new technology to treat prostate cancer. (Michael Zshornack/Photo editor)

UCLA researchers used a technique called MicroED to determine the structure of prions, which can become defective in the body and cause diseases such as mad cow disease. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers determine atomic structure of defective prions

UCLA researchers have determined the atomic structure of part of a protein that causes certain neurodegenerative diseases. In a study published earlier in January, researchers in the lab of Jose Rodriguez, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, determined the structure of a segment of prion, a protein that causes diseases such as mad cow disease, when it is defective. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers used a technique called MicroED to determine the structure of prions, which can become defective in the body and cause diseases such as mad cow disease. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers used a technique called MicroED to determine the structure of prions, which can become defective in the body and cause diseases such as mad cow disease. (Daily Bruin file photo)

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Bird gene-mapping project studies biodiversity, effect of climate change

A new branch of environmental science is taking flight as UCLA researchers apply genomic technology to study migratory birds. The Bird Genoscape Project, based at UCLA’s Center for Tropical Research, will analyze the migratory behavior of up to 100 songbird species using a combination of population genomics and environmental data, said Thomas Smith, the center’s founding director. Read more...

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(Daily Bruin file photo) UCLA Health officials collaborated with professors from the Anderson School of Business to create custom letters to increase patient use of take-home colon cancer screening kits.

UCLA Health provides at-home colon cancer screening kits to patients

UCLA Health is collaborating with marketing experts to incentivize patients to screen themselves at home for cancer. Starting in May, UCLA Health, with the help of researchers at the Anderson School of Management, provided custom letters with take-home colorectal cancer screening kits to encourage patients to use them. Read more...

Photo: (Daily Bruin file photo) UCLA Health officials collaborated with professors from the Anderson School of Business to create custom letters to increase patient use of take-home colon cancer screening kits.

(Daily Bruin file photo) UCLA Health officials collaborated with professors from the Anderson School of Business to create custom letters to increase patient use of take-home colon cancer screening kits.



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