Tuesday, August 21

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science will establish the UCLA Connection Lab with a $5 million grant. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA school of engineering receives $5M for computer network research center

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science received a $5 million grant to establish a new computer networking research center. Sunday Group Inc., a Las Vegas-based software company, donated the money in honor of Leonard Kleinrock, who is considered one of the fathers of the internet, to create the UCLA Connection Lab. Read more...

Photo: The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science will establish the UCLA Connection Lab with a $5 million grant. (Daily Bruin file photo)

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science will establish the UCLA Connection Lab with a $5 million grant. (Daily Bruin file photo)

UCLA researchers demonstrated that BPA, a chemical used in many plastics, caused fertility defects in worms that could still be observed five generations later. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

Researchers discover correlation between BPA exposure, reproductive dysfunction

UCLA researchers discovered that exposure to some chemicals may cause reproductive defects in future generations of humans. In a study published in May, the researchers in the laboratory of Patrick Allard, an assistant professor in the UCLA Institute for Society and Genetics, demonstrated that bisphenol A, a chemical used to strengthen many plastics, caused fertility defects in worms that could still be observed five generations after the parent worms were exposed to BPA. Read more...

Photo: UCLA researchers demonstrated that BPA, a chemical used in many plastics, caused fertility defects in worms that could still be observed five generations later. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

UCLA researchers demonstrated that BPA, a chemical used in many plastics, caused fertility defects in worms that could still be observed five generations later. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

SCALAR is led by Sarah Tolbert, a professor in the department of chemistry and biochemistry and the school of engineering, and Bruce Dunn, chair of the department of materials science and engineering. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

UCLA-led center receives $9.75M grant for rechargeable battery research

A UCLA-led energy research center received $9.75 million to continue its research on how to improve rechargeable batteries. The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the four-year grant to the Synthetic Control Across Length-scales for Advancing Rechargeables center Thursday and designated the center as one of its Energy Frontier Research Centers, according to a university press release. Read more...

Photo: SCALAR is led by Sarah Tolbert, a professor in the department of chemistry and biochemistry and the school of engineering, and Bruce Dunn, chair of the department of materials science and engineering. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

SCALAR is led by Sarah Tolbert, a professor in the department of chemistry and biochemistry and the school of engineering, and Bruce Dunn, chair of the department of materials science and engineering. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)



Judea Pearl, an emeritus professor of computer science at UCLA and pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence, checks his email on a 20-year-old Wyse terminal. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Professor Judea Pearl codes languages to challenge paradigms of computer science

Judea Pearl’s fourth-grade teacher and classmates insisted he was wrong. They were convinced the area of a kilometer-length square was a thousand square meters, not a million like Pearl said. Read more...

Photo: Judea Pearl, an emeritus professor of computer science at UCLA and pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence, checks his email on a 20-year-old Wyse terminal. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Judea Pearl, an emeritus professor of computer science at UCLA and pioneer in the field of artificial intelligence, checks his email on a 20-year-old Wyse terminal. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

(Nicole Anisgard Parra/Illustrations director)

UCLA researchers discover potential reason for unusual atmospheric wave on Venus

UCLA researchers may have discovered the cause of a huge, bow-shaped wave on Venus that has puzzled planetary scientists for years. Their computer simulations of the Venusian atmosphere showed that wind blowing across mountains creates oscillations of the air, called mountain waves, that launch high into the clouds. Read more...

Photo: (Nicole Anisgard Parra/Illustrations director)

(Nicole Anisgard Parra/Illustrations director)