Wednesday, December 12



SMACS earned an award for its efforts to promote green chemistry, which is concerned with designing materials and processes to minimize waste and use of hazardous substances. (Courtesy of Maggie Chen/SMACS)

Student chemistry group wins award for environmental awareness programs

UCLA student chemists won a green chemistry award for their efforts to raise awareness of how chemistry impacts the environment. The American Chemical Society Green Chemistry Institute award is given annually to chapters of the Student Members of the American Chemical Society that promote green chemistry on their campuses. Read more...

Photo: SMACS earned an award for its efforts to promote green chemistry, which is concerned with designing materials and processes to minimize waste and use of hazardous substances. (Courtesy of Maggie Chen/SMACS)

SMACS earned an award for its efforts to promote green chemistry, which is concerned with designing materials and processes to minimize waste and use of hazardous substances. (Courtesy of Maggie Chen/SMACS)

Professors and city officials explained what Los Angeles is doing to combat the urban heat island effect. (Andy Bao/Daily Bruin)

Panelists discuss sustainable policies to alleviate climate change effects in LA

Panelists said Los Angeles should adopt climate change-mitigating infrastructure to combat the urban heat island effect at an event Wednesday. The program “Hot! Hot! Hot!” was the last of a yearlong series that aimed to discuss how Los Angeles can become the first entirely sustainable megacity in the United States. Read more...

Photo: Professors and city officials explained what Los Angeles is doing to combat the urban heat island effect. (Andy Bao/Daily Bruin)

Professors and city officials explained what Los Angeles is doing to combat the urban heat island effect. (Andy Bao/Daily Bruin)

Counseling and Psychological Services collaborated with the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science to provide biweekly drop-in counseling sessions for engineering students. (Daily Bruin file photo)

CAPS, engineering school team up to provide tailored counseling

This post was updated Dec. 10 at 2:24 p.m. UCLA now provides specialized counseling for engineering students. Counseling and Psychological Services collaborated with the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science this quarter to provide biweekly drop-in counseling sessions for engineering students as part of the CAPS satellite clinic at the school of engineering. Read more...

Photo: Counseling and Psychological Services collaborated with the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science to provide biweekly drop-in counseling sessions for engineering students. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Counseling and Psychological Services collaborated with the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science to provide biweekly drop-in counseling sessions for engineering students. (Daily Bruin file photo)


On the left, the pattern of movement for a sperm with an X chromosome, which will create a female fetus. On the right, a slightly different pattern of movement for a sperm with a Y chromosome, which will create a male fetus. (Courtesy of Mustafa Ugur Daloglu et. al./Nature Publishing Group)

Innovation in microscopes lets UCLA lab make new findings about sperm movement

UCLA researchers determined sperm carrying a Y chromosome swim differently than sperm carrying an X chromosome. In a study published October, Aydogan Ozcan, professor of electrical and computer engineering, and his lab constructed a microscope that allows for the 3D tracking of small moving cells like sperm cells. Read more...

Photo: On the left, the pattern of movement for a sperm with an X chromosome, which will create a female fetus. On the right, a slightly different pattern of movement for a sperm with a Y chromosome, which will create a male fetus. (Courtesy of Mustafa Ugur Daloglu et. al./Nature Publishing Group)

On the left, the pattern of movement for a sperm with an X chromosome, which will create a female fetus. On the right, a slightly different pattern of movement for a sperm with a Y chromosome, which will create a male fetus. (Courtesy of Mustafa Ugur Daloglu et. al./Nature Publishing Group)