Wednesday, January 23

Theatrical reading is one of the performance art forms featured in the installation "Ceiling of Shadows (La voûte des ombres): A Night of Victor Hugo," which will highlight Hugo's artwork and writing. Alumna Vaneh Assadourian, who will be reading English translations of Hugo's texts, said she aims to help bring Hugo’s stories to life by working with dancers and musicians. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Alumna’s performance art exhibition highlights works of Victor Hugo

“An unspeakable ceiling of shadows; a depth of obscurity that no diver can fathom; a light mingled with the obscurity, a strange somber vanquished light; brightness reduced to powder.” Victor Hugo’s words, found in his work “The Toilers of the Sea,” inspired alumna Darcie Crager to create “Ceiling of Shadows (La voûte des ombres): A Night of Victor Hugo” to accompany the current exhibit on Hugo’s drawings, “Stones to Stains: The Drawings of Victor Hugo.” The performance art installation, taking place Monday evening at the Hammer Museum, will mix excerpts from Hugo’s novels, poems and speeches with original music, dance and shadow play to provide further context for the continuing art exhibit, highlighting the author’s writing alongside his artwork. Read more...

Photo: Theatrical reading is one of the performance art forms featured in the installation "Ceiling of Shadows (La voûte des ombres): A Night of Victor Hugo," which will highlight Hugo's artwork and writing. Alumna Vaneh Assadourian, who will be reading English translations of Hugo's texts, said she aims to help bring Hugo’s stories to life by working with dancers and musicians. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Theatrical reading is one of the performance art forms featured in the installation "Ceiling of Shadows (La voûte des ombres): A Night of Victor Hugo," which will highlight Hugo's artwork and writing. Alumna Vaneh Assadourian, who will be reading English translations of Hugo's texts, said she aims to help bring Hugo’s stories to life by working with dancers and musicians. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Perla Karney, the artistic director of the Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts, organized an exhibition titled "Love Thy Neighbor : The Refugee Experience." Featured in the exhibition are images from 2017 summer workshops for Israeli and Palestinian women hosted by Saskia Keeley. (Axel Lopez/Assistant Photo editor)

Photography exhibit to showcase connections between Israeli and Palestinian women

This post was updated Oct. 25 at 10:42 a.m. Over 100 Israeli and Palestinian women looked directly into one another’s eyes for the first time in their lives during Saskia Keeley’s workshops. Read more...

Photo: Perla Karney, the artistic director of the Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts, organized an exhibition titled "Love Thy Neighbor : The Refugee Experience." Featured in the exhibition are images from 2017 summer workshops for Israeli and Palestinian women hosted by Saskia Keeley. (Axel Lopez/Assistant Photo editor)

Perla Karney, the artistic director of the Dortort Center for Creativity in the Arts, organized an exhibition titled "Love Thy Neighbor : The Refugee Experience." Featured in the exhibition are images from 2017 summer workshops for Israeli and Palestinian women hosted by Saskia Keeley. (Axel Lopez/Assistant Photo editor)


"World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean," will be on display in the Fowler Museum on Sunday until Feb. 10. The exhibit holds a collection of art and artifacts from East Africa, specifically the Swahili coast. Erica P. Jones, associate curator of African arts at the Fowler, said the collection is meant to explore the significance of the Swahili coast to the rest of the world. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Fowler exhibit to spotlight Swahili coast’s culture and global significance

Objects that have never left Kenya before are now traveling America. “World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean” is an exhibition opening Sunday and on display until Feb. Read more...

Photo: "World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean," will be on display in the Fowler Museum on Sunday until Feb. 10. The exhibit holds a collection of art and artifacts from East Africa, specifically the Swahili coast. Erica P. Jones, associate curator of African arts at the Fowler, said the collection is meant to explore the significance of the Swahili coast to the rest of the world. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

"World on the Horizon: Swahili Arts Across the Indian Ocean," will be on display in the Fowler Museum on Sunday until Feb. 10. The exhibit holds a collection of art and artifacts from East Africa, specifically the Swahili coast. Erica P. Jones, associate curator of African arts at the Fowler, said the collection is meant to explore the significance of the Swahili coast to the rest of the world. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Stephen Rockwell (left), alongside alumni Quinn Francis (center) and Brandon Root (right), star in “A Splintered Soul,” a play following a group of Polish Holocaust survivors attempting to overcome their trauma as they assimilate into American culture. 
(Courtesy of Tracey Roman)

Alumni explore experiences of Holocaust survivors postwar in ‘A Splintered Soul’

Morality in times of survival is questioned as Holocaust survivors attempt to move on in “A Splintered Soul.” The play, premiering at the International City Theatre on Friday, follows a group of Polish Holocaust survivors as they attempt to cope with their traumatic experiences while assimilating into American culture. Read more...

Photo: Stephen Rockwell (left), alongside alumni Quinn Francis (center) and Brandon Root (right), star in “A Splintered Soul,” a play following a group of Polish Holocaust survivors attempting to overcome their trauma as they assimilate into American culture. (Courtesy of Tracey Roman)

Stephen Rockwell (left), alongside alumni Quinn Francis (center) and Brandon Root (right), star in “A Splintered Soul,” a play following a group of Polish Holocaust survivors attempting to overcome their trauma as they assimilate into American culture. 
(Courtesy of Tracey Roman)

MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

MFA student exhibition merges STEM, art to explore consciousness through senses

“Convolution” explores consciousness through light, sound and the scent of a kombucha scoby. Hosted by UCLA Design Media Arts, the “Convolution” exhibition will feature the works of 11 2019 MFA candidates at the New Wight Gallery in UCLA’s Broad Art Center. Read more...

Photo: MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Production of ‘Steambath,’ raunchy ’70s humor intact, comes to the Odyssey

Purgatory is a steam bath and God is a Puerto Rican attendant in Bruce Jay Friedman’s upcoming play. “Steambath,” which premieres Saturday at the Odyssey Theatre, follows the life and afterlife of protagonist Tandy as he grapples with his own mortality. Read more...

Photo: Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics. (Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)


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