Thursday, February 22

Third-year art students Everett Babcock, Angel King and Lorena Ochoa (left to right) collaborated on a large, untitled art piece in their art show that will run until Dec. 12. The show also features individual sculptures and paintings from each of the artists. (Isra Ameen/Daily Bruin)

Students tie experiences together with abstract sculptures, art show

Everett Babcock, Lorena Ochoa and Angel King made abstract sculptures out of wooden sticks, hot-pink foam and gray yarn for their latest art show. “Dyed In The Wool,” which is composed entirely of abstract sculptural pieces and paintings, opened Nov. Read more...

Photo: Third-year art students Everett Babcock, Angel King and Lorena Ochoa (left to right) collaborated on a large, untitled art piece in their art show that will run until Dec. 12. The show also features individual sculptures and paintings from each of the artists. (Isra Ameen/Daily Bruin)

Third-year art students Everett Babcock, Angel King and Lorena Ochoa (left to right) collaborated on a large, untitled art piece in their art show that will run until Dec. 12. The show also features individual sculptures and paintings from each of the artists. (Isra Ameen/Daily Bruin)

Claudia Keener, a fourth-year theater student, portrays Georgia in graduate student Anna Fox's play "Georgia Is Waiting." During the play, Georgia grapples with her father's abandonment over the course of 28 years. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Play seeks to provide accurate portrayal of mental health

The play “Georgia Is Waiting” tells the story of a woman who spends her life haunted by an imaginary bison. The show, written by graduate playwriting student Anna Fox, will run Thursday through Saturday at Macgowan Hall and follows the life of protagonist Georgia as she grapples with the absence of her father. Read more...

Photo: Claudia Keener, a fourth-year theater student, portrays Georgia in graduate student Anna Fox's play "Georgia Is Waiting." During the play, Georgia grapples with her father's abandonment over the course of 28 years. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Claudia Keener, a fourth-year theater student, portrays Georgia in graduate student Anna Fox's play "Georgia Is Waiting." During the play, Georgia grapples with her father's abandonment over the course of 28 years. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

The Museum of Failure opened in Los Angeles  on Friday, and will be open until Feb. 4. The Museum features a range of failed products, from unpopular Oreo flavors, such as PB&J and Swedish Fish, to a Barbie alternative designed to teach children about showing sympathy for the less fortunate. (Hannah Burnett/Assistant Photo editor)

Museum of Failure displays misguided, unsuccessful creations

The Museum of Failure succeeds in exhibiting some of society’s larger failures. First exhibited in Helsingborg, Sweden, the Museum of Failure is the brainchild of Samuel West, a clinical psychologist who began cataloguing and collecting items to celebrate failure, due to the social stigma surrounding the concept of failure. Read more...

Photo: The Museum of Failure opened in Los Angeles on Friday, and will be open until Feb. 4. The Museum features a range of failed products, from unpopular Oreo flavors, such as PB&J and Swedish Fish, to a Barbie alternative designed to teach children about showing sympathy for the less fortunate. (Hannah Burnett/Assistant Photo editor)

The Museum of Failure opened in Los Angeles  on Friday, and will be open until Feb. 4. The Museum features a range of failed products, from unpopular Oreo flavors, such as PB&J and Swedish Fish, to a Barbie alternative designed to teach children about showing sympathy for the less fortunate. (Hannah Burnett/Assistant Photo editor)

"Trojan Barbie," inspired by Euripides' classic "The Trojan Women," features a primarily female cast of UCLA students who re-enact the travesty of war across various eras. (Quanzhao "Ari" He/Daily Bruin)

Modern version of Greek classic aims to highlight future of women

The cast and crew of “Trojan Barbie” prepared for their first dress rehearsal on a stage littered with dismembered doll parts. Directed by Beth Lopes and written by Christine Evans, “Trojan Barbie” is a reinvention of Euripides’ “The Trojan Women” starring a cast of primarily female UCLA students. Read more...

Photo: "Trojan Barbie," inspired by Euripides' classic "The Trojan Women," features a primarily female cast of UCLA students who re-enact the travesty of war across various eras. (Quanzhao "Ari" He/Daily Bruin)

"Trojan Barbie," inspired by Euripides' classic "The Trojan Women," features a primarily female cast of UCLA students who re-enact the travesty of war across various eras. (Quanzhao "Ari" He/Daily Bruin)

Graduate acting student Annalise Staudt plays a wealthy woman, Claire Zachanassian, who returns to her hometown to exact revenge on her ex-boyfriend Anton Schill, played by graduate acting student Brett Calo. (Nick Kardan/Daily Bruin)

‘The Visit’ provides comedic yet dark take on relationships, morality

Relationship drama reaches a new high in “The Visit.” The 1956 play by Friedrich Durrenmatt tells the story of Claire Zachanassian, a wealthy woman who returns to her hometown in an unspecified country, promising to donate a billion marks to the financially struggling community on the condition that the townspeople murder her ex-boyfriend, Anton Schill. Read more...

Photo: Graduate acting student Annalise Staudt plays a wealthy woman, Claire Zachanassian, who returns to her hometown to exact revenge on her ex-boyfriend Anton Schill, played by graduate acting student Brett Calo. (Nick Kardan/Daily Bruin)

Graduate acting student Annalise Staudt plays a wealthy woman, Claire Zachanassian, who returns to her hometown to exact revenge on her ex-boyfriend Anton Schill, played by graduate acting student Brett Calo. (Nick Kardan/Daily Bruin)

Actors Donna Simone Johnson, Christopher Rivas and Natalie Camunas play all of the parts in "Pang!", a series of live radio plays directed by UCLA professor Dan Froot. The show is based on the real experiences of three families across the United States who have dealt with food insecurity, discrimination toward immigrants, the foreclosure crisis and gun violence. (Courtesy of Dan Froot)

Professor directs radio plays about problems low-income families face

Several audience members at “Pang!,” a series of three live radio plays, sit around a kitchen table onstage instead of in their seats. Before, during and after the show, the play’s director sits down at the table and encourages the audience members to discuss food insecurity, housing issues and other core themes of the play. Read more...

Photo: Actors Donna Simone Johnson, Christopher Rivas and Natalie Camunas play all of the parts in "Pang!", a series of live radio plays directed by UCLA professor Dan Froot. The show is based on the real experiences of three families across the United States who have dealt with food insecurity, discrimination toward immigrants, the foreclosure crisis and gun violence. (Courtesy of Dan Froot)

Actors Donna Simone Johnson, Christopher Rivas and Natalie Camunas play all of the parts in "Pang!", a series of live radio plays directed by UCLA professor Dan Froot. The show is based on the real experiences of three families across the United States who have dealt with food insecurity, discrimination toward immigrants, the foreclosure crisis and gun violence. (Courtesy of Dan Froot)

(Rachel Bai/Daily Bruin)

Professor’s sculptural video installation to illuminate Philadelphia

Jennifer Steinkamp was, like Benjamin Franklin, intrigued by electricity. For her latest art piece, Steinkamp, a design media arts professor, created a sculptural video installation, titled “Winter Fountains,” which will be illuminated sunset to midnight from Thursday to March 18 as a part of the centennial celebration of the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia. Read more...

Photo: (Rachel Bai/Daily Bruin)

(Rachel Bai/Daily Bruin)


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