Friday, November 16

Stephen Rockwell (left), alongside alumni Quinn Francis (center) and Brandon Root (right), star in “A Splintered Soul,” a play following a group of Polish Holocaust survivors attempting to overcome their trauma as they assimilate into American culture. 
(Courtesy of Tracey Roman)

Alumni explore experiences of Holocaust survivors postwar in ‘A Splintered Soul’

Morality in times of survival is questioned as Holocaust survivors attempt to move on in “A Splintered Soul.” The play, premiering at the International City Theatre on Friday, follows a group of Polish Holocaust survivors as they attempt to cope with their traumatic experiences while assimilating into American culture. Read more...

Photo: Stephen Rockwell (left), alongside alumni Quinn Francis (center) and Brandon Root (right), star in “A Splintered Soul,” a play following a group of Polish Holocaust survivors attempting to overcome their trauma as they assimilate into American culture. (Courtesy of Tracey Roman)

Stephen Rockwell (left), alongside alumni Quinn Francis (center) and Brandon Root (right), star in “A Splintered Soul,” a play following a group of Polish Holocaust survivors attempting to overcome their trauma as they assimilate into American culture. 
(Courtesy of Tracey Roman)

MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

MFA student exhibition merges STEM, art to explore consciousness through senses

“Convolution” explores consciousness through light, sound and the scent of a kombucha scoby. Hosted by UCLA Design Media Arts, the “Convolution” exhibition will feature the works of 11 2019 MFA candidates at the New Wight Gallery in UCLA’s Broad Art Center. Read more...

Photo: MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Production of ‘Steambath,’ raunchy ’70s humor intact, comes to the Odyssey

Purgatory is a steam bath and God is a Puerto Rican attendant in Bruce Jay Friedman’s upcoming play. “Steambath,” which premieres Saturday at the Odyssey Theatre, follows the life and afterlife of protagonist Tandy as he grapples with his own mortality. Read more...

Photo: Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics. (Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Elvis Presley returns as a phantom in “Blue Moon Over Memphis,” an American rendition of Japanese Noh theater. The classical theater style often incorporates hand-carved masks and elaborate, traditional costumes. (Courtesy of David Surtasky)

American adaptation unmasks Japanese theater form to reveal artistic complexities

Elvis Presley comes back to life in traditional Japanese theater in “Blue Moon Over Memphis.” Theatre Nohgaku, a Noh theater company, will perform the play as part of “2 Days of Noh,” a symposium on the classical Japanese musical theater form. Read more...

Photo: Elvis Presley returns as a phantom in “Blue Moon Over Memphis,” an American rendition of Japanese Noh theater. The classical theater style often incorporates hand-carved masks and elaborate, traditional costumes. (Courtesy of David Surtasky)

Elvis Presley returns as a phantom in “Blue Moon Over Memphis,” an American rendition of Japanese Noh theater. The classical theater style often incorporates hand-carved masks and elaborate, traditional costumes. (Courtesy of David Surtasky)

The Radical Publishing Weekend will include an exhibition in the Fowler Musuem titled "South of No North." The blown-up photographs and artwork from books of independent publishing company Gate Negro Ediciones will be featured on the walls of the building's interior. (Courtesy of Sebastian Clough)

Event to celebrate Mexican independent publishing amid struggles of censorship

Vivid art blown up onto the Fowler Museum’s walls will represent the radical opinions found in independently published Mexican art books. Fowler will hold the Artbook Pop-Up, which is part of a three-day event called Radical Publishing Weekend, and will include a pop-up shop and discussion panel. Read more...

Photo: The Radical Publishing Weekend will include an exhibition in the Fowler Musuem titled "South of No North." The blown-up photographs and artwork from books of independent publishing company Gate Negro Ediciones will be featured on the walls of the building's interior. (Courtesy of Sebastian Clough)

The Radical Publishing Weekend will include an exhibition in the Fowler Musuem titled "South of No North." The blown-up photographs and artwork from books of independent publishing company Gate Negro Ediciones will be featured on the walls of the building's interior. (Courtesy of Sebastian Clough)

Tim Chiou and Julia Cho star in “Two Mile Hollow,” a comedic parody meant to examine white privilege. Through casting Asian-American actors in stereotypically white roles, Chiou said they aim to debunk the preconceived notions of being a minority. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Comedic parody ‘Two Mile Hollow’ a challenging commentary on race, privilege

A rich, white family vacations in the Hamptons – but they’re portrayed by Asian-American actors. While “Two Mile Hollow” is a comedic parody, the play uses its casting to unpack and examine white privilege, while also creating roles for Asian actors. Read more...

Photo: Tim Chiou and Julia Cho star in “Two Mile Hollow,” a comedic parody meant to examine white privilege. Through casting Asian-American actors in stereotypically white roles, Chiou said they aim to debunk the preconceived notions of being a minority. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)

Tim Chiou and Julia Cho star in “Two Mile Hollow,” a comedic parody meant to examine white privilege. Through casting Asian-American actors in stereotypically white roles, Chiou said they aim to debunk the preconceived notions of being a minority. (Mia Kayser/Daily Bruin)



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