Saturday, September 22

Actress Magdalena Edwards portrayes one of the mother-daughter duos in “Houses Without Walls.” The play depicts two mothers as they  ponder the fates of their daughters during the Cuban Revolution. Real events, such as the mass exodus of Cubans fleeing Fidel Castro's regime, inspired some of the scenes in the one-act play. "Houses Without Walls" will premier Sunday at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Alumna’s play explores political turmoil, mother-daughter relationships

This post was updated May 31 at 3:35 p.m. A barrier between two neighbors will be torn down in “Houses Without Walls.” Susannah Rodríguez Drissi, an alumna and lecturer in UCLA’s Writing Program, wrote, directed and produced the play set during the tumultuous years of the Mariel boatlift in Cuba. Read more...

Photo: Actress Magdalena Edwards portrayes one of the mother-daughter duos in “Houses Without Walls.” The play depicts two mothers as they ponder the fates of their daughters during the Cuban Revolution. Real events, such as the mass exodus of Cubans fleeing Fidel Castro's regime, inspired some of the scenes in the one-act play. "Houses Without Walls" will premier Sunday at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Actress Magdalena Edwards portrayes one of the mother-daughter duos in “Houses Without Walls.” The play depicts two mothers as they  ponder the fates of their daughters during the Cuban Revolution. Real events, such as the mass exodus of Cubans fleeing Fidel Castro's regime, inspired some of the scenes in the one-act play. "Houses Without Walls" will premier Sunday at the Hollywood Fringe Festival. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)


Actor Mick Torres performed in the After Hours Theatre Company's presentation of Dale Wasserman’s stage play of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Alumnus Graham Wetterhahn produced the interactive experience, which he said allows guests to feel as though they are being checked into a mental hospital. (Photo courtesy of KJ Knies)

Spectators act as patients and interact with cast in After Hours’ asylum play

Theatergoers put on light blue hospital gowns and transformed into psychiatric patients from 1963 as part of an immersive performance Friday evening. After Hours Theatre Company presented Dale Wasserman’s stage adaptation of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest,” based on the novel by Ken Kesey, in a Burbank warehouse decorated to look like a 1960s psychiatric hospital. Read more...

Photo: Actor Mick Torres performed in the After Hours Theatre Company's presentation of Dale Wasserman’s stage play of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Alumnus Graham Wetterhahn produced the interactive experience, which he said allows guests to feel as though they are being checked into a mental hospital. (Photo courtesy of KJ Knies)

Actor Mick Torres performed in the After Hours Theatre Company's presentation of Dale Wasserman’s stage play of “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Alumnus Graham Wetterhahn produced the interactive experience, which he said allows guests to feel as though they are being checked into a mental hospital. (Photo courtesy of KJ Knies)

Alumna Ana Fernandez paints everyday scenes from around San Antonio. In "Collier Pool," she captures a Latino family going for a swim in a public pool. (Courtesy of Ana Fernandez)

UCLA alumna’s paintings of everyday life featured in San Antonio gallery

Ana Fernandez and her “chili queens” dish out Tex-Mex food from her San Antonio food truck, Chamoy City Limits. The truck has also become a source of inspiration for Fernandez’s paintings. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Ana Fernandez paints everyday scenes from around San Antonio. In "Collier Pool," she captures a Latino family going for a swim in a public pool. (Courtesy of Ana Fernandez)

Alumna Ana Fernandez paints everyday scenes from around San Antonio. In "Collier Pool," she captures a Latino family going for a swim in a public pool. (Courtesy of Ana Fernandez)

The musical adaptation of "Spring Awakening" is often performed, but graduate directing student Evelina Stampa chose the original play to address sensitive topics like sexuality. (Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

Production of ‘Spring Awakening’ navigates gender roles, adolescent hardship

Evelina Stampa’s school got in trouble for discussing “Spring Awakening” in class, but now in graduate school, she’s directing the same play on the main stage of the Little Theater. Read more...

Photo: The musical adaptation of "Spring Awakening" is often performed, but graduate directing student Evelina Stampa chose the original play to address sensitive topics like sexuality. (Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

The musical adaptation of "Spring Awakening" is often performed, but graduate directing student Evelina Stampa chose the original play to address sensitive topics like sexuality. (Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

Fourth-year world arts and cultures student Sebastian Moraga put together “MOVEMENT JOURNAL: Identity, Neighborhood Change, Interdisciplinary Arts,” a journal documenting artists all across the state of California. Moraga spent six months mingling with creatives throughout the state to compile the journal, which features interviews, photographs and essays chronicling the artists' narratives. (Lisa Aubry/Daily Bruin)

Student tells creatives’ narratives in solo project ‘MOVEMENT JOURNAL’

Sebastian Moraga dove headfirst into the California art scene six months ago, mingling with visionaries at music concerts and neighborhood bodegas to create his most recent artwork. Read more...

Photo: Fourth-year world arts and cultures student Sebastian Moraga put together “MOVEMENT JOURNAL: Identity, Neighborhood Change, Interdisciplinary Arts,” a journal documenting artists all across the state of California. Moraga spent six months mingling with creatives throughout the state to compile the journal, which features interviews, photographs and essays chronicling the artists' narratives. (Lisa Aubry/Daily Bruin)

Fourth-year world arts and cultures student Sebastian Moraga put together “MOVEMENT JOURNAL: Identity, Neighborhood Change, Interdisciplinary Arts,” a journal documenting artists all across the state of California. Moraga spent six months mingling with creatives throughout the state to compile the journal, which features interviews, photographs and essays chronicling the artists' narratives. (Lisa Aubry/Daily Bruin)

Jared Ortaliza, a second-year human biology and society student, and Mary McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student (left to right), planned a showcase called “Visible People” to create a platform for AAPI representation in pop culture. (Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Assistant photo editor)

‘Visible People’ to showcase Asian-American, Pacific Islander cultural diversity

Mary McHenry and Jared Ortaliza came up with the idea for the show “Visible People” while eating dishes of pad thai and pad see ew. McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student and Ortaliza, a second-year pre-human biology and society student, had both been thinking independently about putting together a showcase of Asian-American and Pacific Islander artists. Read more...

Photo: Jared Ortaliza, a second-year human biology and society student, and Mary McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student (left to right), planned a showcase called “Visible People” to create a platform for AAPI representation in pop culture. (Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Assistant photo editor)

Jared Ortaliza, a second-year human biology and society student, and Mary McHenry, a third-year ethnomusicology student (left to right), planned a showcase called “Visible People” to create a platform for AAPI representation in pop culture. (Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Assistant photo editor)


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