Tuesday, January 23

In the art installation "Brainstorming: Empathy,"
 participants wear EEG-equipped headpieces, allowing them to see each other's brain wave activity through colored LEDs, resulting in wordless communication. (courtesy of Victoria Vesna)

Design media arts professor creates neuroscience-based installation

It may not be possible to read other people’s minds, but viewers can now see what two people are feeling through the art installation “BrainStorming: Empathy.” Victoria Vesna, a design media arts professor and Mark Cohen, a neuroscience professor in residence created “BrainStorming: Empathy,” a piece of performance and experiential art, after four years of work. Read more...

Photo: In the art installation "Brainstorming: Empathy," participants wear EEG-equipped headpieces, allowing them to see each other's brain wave activity through colored LEDs, resulting in wordless communication. (courtesy of Victoria Vesna)

In the art installation "Brainstorming: Empathy,"
 participants wear EEG-equipped headpieces, allowing them to see each other's brain wave activity through colored LEDs, resulting in wordless communication. (courtesy of Victoria Vesna)

Alumna Gabby So created her own one-woman show "Struggle for Happiness," which she premiered in Hong Kong. She will now be performing the show in New York City from Tuesday to Sunday at the Studio Theatre of Theatre Row.  (Courtesy of Ken Yeung)

Alumna actress conquers artistic dependence through self-production

Gabby So first fell in love with theater when she flew above the audience as the ghost of Catherine Earnshaw in a stage adaptation of “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” The UCLA alumna said she used to grapple with insecurity and a perceived lack of recognition as a theater actress. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Gabby So created her own one-woman show "Struggle for Happiness," which she premiered in Hong Kong. She will now be performing the show in New York City from Tuesday to Sunday at the Studio Theatre of Theatre Row. (Courtesy of Ken Yeung)

Alumna Gabby So created her own one-woman show "Struggle for Happiness," which she premiered in Hong Kong. She will now be performing the show in New York City from Tuesday to Sunday at the Studio Theatre of Theatre Row.  (Courtesy of Ken Yeung)

(Courtesy of Jonathan Olley/Lucasfilm)

Movie review: ‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’

Not so long ago in a galaxy not so far away, J.J. Abrams reawakened the Star Wars franchise with a rehash of “Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope.” Thankfully, Rian Johnson’s new Star Wars film learned how to balance nostalgia for the original hexalogy with new plot lines in “Star Wars: The Last Jedi.” “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” is Johnson’s first foray into the Star Wars universe and the eighth film in the series, not counting “A Star Wars Story: Rogue One.” It distinguishes itself from the other entries in the Star Wars canon with its original story and powerful scenes. Read more...

Photo: (Courtesy of Jonathan Olley/Lucasfilm)

(Courtesy of Jonathan Olley/Lucasfilm)

Marie Osterman, a third-year theater student, plays Don Pedro in the theater company Project Nongenue's latest rendition of "Much Ado About Nothing." (Courtesy of Project Nongenue)

Theater company gender-bends classic play to empower women’s voices

Men played women in the original Shakespearean plays, but women will get to play men in Project Nongenue’s production of “Much Ado About Nothing.” Project Nongenue, a Los Angeles-based theater company, explores the experiences of marginalized communities through classical theater. Read more...

Photo: Marie Osterman, a third-year theater student, plays Don Pedro in the theater company Project Nongenue's latest rendition of "Much Ado About Nothing." (Courtesy of Project Nongenue)

Marie Osterman, a third-year theater student, plays Don Pedro in the theater company Project Nongenue's latest rendition of "Much Ado About Nothing." (Courtesy of Project Nongenue)

Third-year art students Everett Babcock, Angel King and Lorena Ochoa (left to right) collaborated on a large, untitled art piece in their art show that will run until Dec. 12. The show also features individual sculptures and paintings from each of the artists. (Isra Ameen/Daily Bruin)

Students tie experiences together with abstract sculptures, art show

Everett Babcock, Lorena Ochoa and Angel King made abstract sculptures out of wooden sticks, hot-pink foam and gray yarn for their latest art show. “Dyed In The Wool,” which is composed entirely of abstract sculptural pieces and paintings, opened Nov. Read more...

Photo: Third-year art students Everett Babcock, Angel King and Lorena Ochoa (left to right) collaborated on a large, untitled art piece in their art show that will run until Dec. 12. The show also features individual sculptures and paintings from each of the artists. (Isra Ameen/Daily Bruin)

Third-year art students Everett Babcock, Angel King and Lorena Ochoa (left to right) collaborated on a large, untitled art piece in their art show that will run until Dec. 12. The show also features individual sculptures and paintings from each of the artists. (Isra Ameen/Daily Bruin)

Claudia Keener, a fourth-year theater student, portrays Georgia in graduate student Anna Fox's play "Georgia Is Waiting." During the play, Georgia grapples with her father's abandonment over the course of 28 years. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Play seeks to provide accurate portrayal of mental health

The play “Georgia Is Waiting” tells the story of a woman who spends her life haunted by an imaginary bison. The show, written by graduate playwriting student Anna Fox, will run Thursday through Saturday at Macgowan Hall and follows the life of protagonist Georgia as she grapples with the absence of her father. Read more...

Photo: Claudia Keener, a fourth-year theater student, portrays Georgia in graduate student Anna Fox's play "Georgia Is Waiting." During the play, Georgia grapples with her father's abandonment over the course of 28 years. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Claudia Keener, a fourth-year theater student, portrays Georgia in graduate student Anna Fox's play "Georgia Is Waiting." During the play, Georgia grapples with her father's abandonment over the course of 28 years. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

The Museum of Failure opened in Los Angeles  on Friday, and will be open until Feb. 4. The Museum features a range of failed products, from unpopular Oreo flavors, such as PB&J and Swedish Fish, to a Barbie alternative designed to teach children about showing sympathy for the less fortunate. (Hannah Burnett/Assistant Photo editor)

Museum of Failure displays misguided, unsuccessful creations

The Museum of Failure succeeds in exhibiting some of society’s larger failures. First exhibited in Helsingborg, Sweden, the Museum of Failure is the brainchild of Samuel West, a clinical psychologist who began cataloguing and collecting items to celebrate failure, due to the social stigma surrounding the concept of failure. Read more...

Photo: The Museum of Failure opened in Los Angeles on Friday, and will be open until Feb. 4. The Museum features a range of failed products, from unpopular Oreo flavors, such as PB&J and Swedish Fish, to a Barbie alternative designed to teach children about showing sympathy for the less fortunate. (Hannah Burnett/Assistant Photo editor)

The Museum of Failure opened in Los Angeles  on Friday, and will be open until Feb. 4. The Museum features a range of failed products, from unpopular Oreo flavors, such as PB&J and Swedish Fish, to a Barbie alternative designed to teach children about showing sympathy for the less fortunate. (Hannah Burnett/Assistant Photo editor)