Saturday, July 20

UCLA's playwright-in-residence Paula Vogel said her works continue to be influenced by the works of playwrights past. Her recent play, "Indecent," is based off Sholem Asch's "God of Vengeance." The documentary screening of "The Rest I Make Up" that Vogel is hosting is inspired by playwright María Irene Fornés, whom Vogel describes as life-changing. (Courtesy of Laurie Sturdevant)

Q&A: Playwright Paula Vogel discusses her play ‘Indecent’ and influential writers

The words of playwrights past continue to influence Pulitzer Prize winner Paula Vogel. The 2018-2019 playwright-in-residence for the UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television received the award for her 1997 drama, “How I Learned to Drive.” Her latest work, “Indecent,” is based on the scandal that followed the Broadway debut of the Yiddish play “God of Vengeance,” and will premiere Wednesday at the Ahmanson Theatre. Read more...

Photo: UCLA's playwright-in-residence Paula Vogel said her works continue to be influenced by the works of playwrights past. Her recent play, "Indecent," is based off Sholem Asch's "God of Vengeance." The documentary screening of "The Rest I Make Up" that Vogel is hosting is inspired by playwright María Irene Fornés, whom Vogel describes as life-changing. (Courtesy of Laurie Sturdevant)

UCLA's playwright-in-residence Paula Vogel said her works continue to be influenced by the works of playwrights past. Her recent play, "Indecent," is based off Sholem Asch's "God of Vengeance." The documentary screening of "The Rest I Make Up" that Vogel is hosting is inspired by playwright María Irene Fornés, whom Vogel describes as life-changing. (Courtesy of Laurie Sturdevant)

Actors gave a reading of a screenplay titled “James Dean America” during an event hosted by the UCLA Center for Health Services and Society. The story follows a producer's assistant who attempts to sway a writer into selling his old script in order to create a film. (Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

UCLA health program hosts live reading of ‘James Dean America’

This post was updated June 4 at 12:08 p.m. James Dean might have died in 1955, but he was brought back to life this weekend. On Saturday, the UCLA Center for Health Services and Society hosted a live table read of the screenplay “James Dean America” in collaboration with the Healing and Education through the Arts Program. Read more...

Photo: Actors gave a reading of a screenplay titled “James Dean America” during an event hosted by the UCLA Center for Health Services and Society. The story follows a producer's assistant who attempts to sway a writer into selling his old script in order to create a film. (Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

Actors gave a reading of a screenplay titled “James Dean America” during an event hosted by the UCLA Center for Health Services and Society. The story follows a producer's assistant who attempts to sway a writer into selling his old script in order to create a film. (Elise Tsai/Daily Bruin)

Julia Koerner incorporated 3D printing and prototyping into her costume design for “Black Panther.” Koerner said she uses the software to teach students about architecture and building design. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

UCLA architecture professor uses 3D printing in forward-thinking fashion designs

This post was updated on June 3 at 6:20 p.m. Julia Koerner said she sees the human body as a smaller version of a building – fashion sheaths the body much like a facade covers a work of architecture. Read more...

Photo: Julia Koerner incorporated 3D printing and prototyping into her costume design for “Black Panther.” Koerner said she uses the software to teach students about architecture and building design. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

Julia Koerner incorporated 3D printing and prototyping into her costume design for “Black Panther.” Koerner said she uses the software to teach students about architecture and building design. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)


Alumnus Andrew Ge features as part of the ensemble in East West Players' production of "Mamma Mia!" despite having very little experience with musicals. This version of "Mamma Mia!" is especially meaningful for Ge because, with an all Asian American cast, it was a chance for them to take the spotlight rather than being reduced to secondary and background characters, he said. (Courtesy of Steven Lam)

Alumnus discusses role in Asian cast production of ‘Mamma Mia!’

BY OLIVIA MAZZUCATO Daily Bruin reporter UCLA alumnus Andrew Ge had acted for film and television, but he had never been in a musical when he attended the open call auditions for “Mamma Mia!” However, Ge had a background in live performance while at UCLA – he had been a part of the marching band, Samahang Modern dance crew and the UCLA Chorale and Chamber Singers. Read more...

Photo: Alumnus Andrew Ge features as part of the ensemble in East West Players' production of "Mamma Mia!" despite having very little experience with musicals. This version of "Mamma Mia!" is especially meaningful for Ge because, with an all Asian American cast, it was a chance for them to take the spotlight rather than being reduced to secondary and background characters, he said. (Courtesy of Steven Lam)

Alumnus Andrew Ge features as part of the ensemble in East West Players' production of "Mamma Mia!" despite having very little experience with musicals. This version of "Mamma Mia!" is especially meaningful for Ge because, with an all Asian American cast, it was a chance for them to take the spotlight rather than being reduced to secondary and background characters, he said. (Courtesy of Steven Lam)

Graduate student Aya Saleh will direct “Scorched” for her senior thesis, a play she first read when she was 13. The story follows twin siblings, Janine and Simon, who travel from Canada to Lebanon to find their father and brother. (Courtesy of Aya Saleh)

‘Scorched’ shines a light on the role of maintaining identity through hardship

Aya Saleh’s father gave her a play to read when she was 13 years old. Now, Saleh is directing the same piece as her senior thesis within the theater department. Read more...

Photo: Graduate student Aya Saleh will direct “Scorched” for her senior thesis, a play she first read when she was 13. The story follows twin siblings, Janine and Simon, who travel from Canada to Lebanon to find their father and brother. (Courtesy of Aya Saleh)

Graduate student Aya Saleh will direct “Scorched” for her senior thesis, a play she first read when she was 13. The story follows twin siblings, Janine and Simon, who travel from Canada to Lebanon to find their father and brother. (Courtesy of Aya Saleh)

Graduate student Sam Congdon featured male performers and plaster objects as part of the opening showing of "An Unreal Unity." His project, part of the design media arts exhibition, is titled “Buddy Party (Propositional Un-memberment for a Brighter Future).” (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

Experimental works invite interaction, comment on sociopolitical systems

Curators usually chide visitors for touching an artistic installation. But in “An Unreal Unity,” interaction is key. The ongoing exhibition featuring work from graduating design media arts students will be displayed in the New Wight Gallery in Broad Art Center through Thursday. Read more...

Photo: Graduate student Sam Congdon featured male performers and plaster objects as part of the opening showing of "An Unreal Unity." His project, part of the design media arts exhibition, is titled “Buddy Party (Propositional Un-memberment for a Brighter Future).” (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

Graduate student Sam Congdon featured male performers and plaster objects as part of the opening showing of "An Unreal Unity." His project, part of the design media arts exhibition, is titled “Buddy Party (Propositional Un-memberment for a Brighter Future).” (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)