Tuesday, October 23

Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Spook City: Los Angeles Haunted Hayride’s lofty scares enlivened by local lore

Los Angeles is supposed to be the City of Stars, but once those stars fade, where do they go? Do they stay behind, forever attached to their final location, spooking guests who dare to enter their domain? Read more...

Photo: Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Devin Daniels, Ram Eshwar Kaundinya – fourth-year cognitive science student – and Atticus Reynolds (left to right) formed Kune Do, a band that performs both improvisational and composed music. They will perform at "Fowler Out Loud" on Wednesday in the Fowler Museum.  (Courtesy of Ram Eshwar Kaundinya)

Eclectic band to bring Indian, Puerto Rican rhythms to student concerts

Bruce Lee’s martial arts philosophy influences Kune Do, a band which incorporates a multitude of different styles of music. The band was first created by Atticus Reynolds and fourth-year cognitive science student Ram Eshwar Kaundinya when they realized the similarities between traditional Indian rhythms and Puerto Rican rhythms. Read more...

Photo: Devin Daniels, Ram Eshwar Kaundinya – fourth-year cognitive science student – and Atticus Reynolds (left to right) formed Kune Do, a band that performs both improvisational and composed music. They will perform at "Fowler Out Loud" on Wednesday in the Fowler Museum. (Courtesy of Ram Eshwar Kaundinya)

Devin Daniels, Ram Eshwar Kaundinya – fourth-year cognitive science student – and Atticus Reynolds (left to right) formed Kune Do, a band that performs both improvisational and composed music. They will perform at "Fowler Out Loud" on Wednesday in the Fowler Museum.  (Courtesy of Ram Eshwar Kaundinya)

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Professor’s book explores intersectionality of ableism, race through fantasy

Blind demons, demigod twins and werewolves with OCD are referenced in Sami Schalk’s book about bodyminds. Bodymind, the concept of overlap of the body and mind and how they influence each other, is integral to Schalk’s book “Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction.” The work addresses how the idea of bodymind and categories of race, gender and disability are intertwined, arguing that disability studies can help scholars better understand black feminist theory, Schalk said. Read more...

Photo: Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Tigran Hamasyan, an Armenian pianist and composer, performed in Royce Hall on Sunday. He performed selections from previous albums and improvised other songs, using influences from his Armenian heritage and jazz. (Courtesy of Elena Hamasyan)

Musician’s unique performance blends Armenian folk, jazz improvisation

Tigran Hamasyan reimagined his native homeland of Armenia through a traditional, folk-inspired jazz performance Sunday evening. Hamasyan, a pianist and composer, performed a 90-minute jazz piano recital in Royce Hall to a packed audience. Read more...

Photo: Tigran Hamasyan, an Armenian pianist and composer, performed in Royce Hall on Sunday. He performed selections from previous albums and improvised other songs, using influences from his Armenian heritage and jazz. (Courtesy of Elena Hamasyan)

Tigran Hamasyan, an Armenian pianist and composer, performed in Royce Hall on Sunday. He performed selections from previous albums and improvised other songs, using influences from his Armenian heritage and jazz. (Courtesy of Elena Hamasyan)

Bruin Film Society events coordinator Kevin Yang conducted a Q&A with “Eighth Grade” director Bo Burnham and actress Elsie Fisher at its Sept. 26 event. Following a screening of the film, they discussed the importance of accurately depicting teenage characters. (Courtesy of Juan Díaz)

UCLA film society’s partnership provides accessibility to industry professionals

This post was updated Oct. 15 at 1:19 p.m. Bo Burnham recently answered students’ questions in a Bruin Film Society event. This week, students can watch an advance screening of “Mid90s,” directed by Jonah Hill. Read more...

Photo: Bruin Film Society events coordinator Kevin Yang conducted a Q&A with “Eighth Grade” director Bo Burnham and actress Elsie Fisher at its Sept. 26 event. Following a screening of the film, they discussed the importance of accurately depicting teenage characters. (Courtesy of Juan Díaz)

Bruin Film Society events coordinator Kevin Yang conducted a Q&A with “Eighth Grade” director Bo Burnham and actress Elsie Fisher at its Sept. 26 event. Following a screening of the film, they discussed the importance of accurately depicting teenage characters. (Courtesy of Juan Díaz)

Elvis Presley returns as a phantom in “Blue Moon Over Memphis,” an American rendition of Japanese Noh theater. The classical theater style often incorporates hand-carved masks and elaborate, traditional costumes. (Courtesy of David Surtasky)

American adaptation unmasks Japanese theater form to reveal artistic complexities

Elvis Presley comes back to life in traditional Japanese theater in “Blue Moon Over Memphis.” Theatre Nohgaku, a Noh theater company, will perform the play as part of “2 Days of Noh,” a symposium on the classical Japanese musical theater form. Read more...

Photo: Elvis Presley returns as a phantom in “Blue Moon Over Memphis,” an American rendition of Japanese Noh theater. The classical theater style often incorporates hand-carved masks and elaborate, traditional costumes. (Courtesy of David Surtasky)

Elvis Presley returns as a phantom in “Blue Moon Over Memphis,” an American rendition of Japanese Noh theater. The classical theater style often incorporates hand-carved masks and elaborate, traditional costumes. (Courtesy of David Surtasky)

Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)

Student’s company offers products for natural breast enhancement

Afshan “Affy” Hussain went from scheduling a breast reduction consultation to promoting natural approaches to breast growth. The third-year neuroscience student said she struggled with back pains and ill-fitting clothing but began seeing her body differently after being approached by other women saying they admired her figure. Read more...

Photo: Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)

Third-year neuroscience student Afshan "Affy" Hussain founded Nari Company, a business that sells oils, bars and guides to enhance natural breast growth. The approaches are not backed by scientific evidence – instead, they were passed on through generations of her family and have shown results, Hussain said. (MacKenzie Coffman/Assistant Photo editor)