Friday, February 23

UCLA dance professor Willy Souly grew up in Burkina Faso where he attended many Djanjobas,  cultural gatherings that involve dance circles and storytelling set to music. (Bilal Ismail Ahmed/Daily Bruin senior staff)

West African festival aims to bring culture to LA through music and dance

Willy Souly’s first Djanjoba dance circle in Burkina Faso did not involve a lot of dancing. “Everyone was expecting me to move and, growing up shy, I froze for almost an entire minute,” Souly said. Read more...

Photo: UCLA dance professor Willy Souly grew up in Burkina Faso where he attended many Djanjobas, cultural gatherings that involve dance circles and storytelling set to music. (Bilal Ismail Ahmed/Daily Bruin senior staff)

UCLA dance professor Willy Souly grew up in Burkina Faso where he attended many Djanjobas,  cultural gatherings that involve dance circles and storytelling set to music. (Bilal Ismail Ahmed/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Fourth-year students Conor Cusack, Jack Vorster, and Margaret LaGaly (left to right) host pop-up brunches in their apartment and backyard. They build their brunches around an encompassing theme, such as "Brunch on the Playground" and “‘Twas the Brunch Before Christmas." (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Students cook creative dishes, host affordable brunches in apartment

Conor Cusack and Margaret LaGaly fervently discussed eggs for an hour while cleaning up after their pop-up brunch in November. Cusack, LaGaly and their friend Jack Vorster – collectively known as JACOMA – plan and host brunches in their apartment. Read more...

Photo: Fourth-year students Conor Cusack, Jack Vorster, and Margaret LaGaly (left to right) host pop-up brunches in their apartment and backyard. They build their brunches around an encompassing theme, such as "Brunch on the Playground" and “‘Twas the Brunch Before Christmas." (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Fourth-year students Conor Cusack, Jack Vorster, and Margaret LaGaly (left to right) host pop-up brunches in their apartment and backyard. They build their brunches around an encompassing theme, such as "Brunch on the Playground" and “‘Twas the Brunch Before Christmas." (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Alumna Joanna Lynn-Jacobs will be performing at Performances à la Carte's upcoming concert "HIDDEN TREASURES: The Innas, Ettas, Annas and Donnas of Mozart's Operas." The concert aims to contextualize and dignify the flat and oftentimes restricted female characters of Mozart's operas. (Aubrey Yeo/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Concert aims to challenge traditional, restrictive female roles in opera

Mozart’s character Dorabella has temper tantrums and fits of lovesick swooning, but Joanna Lynn-Jacobs wants to dignify her sorrow. Alumna and mezzo-soprano Lynn-Jacobs will perform in “HIDDEN TREASURES: The Innas, Ettas, Annas & Donnas of Mozart’s Operas,” a concert by Performances à la Carte, a Southern California-based arts organization, at the Neighborhood Unitarian Universalist Church in Pasadena on Sunday afternoon. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Joanna Lynn-Jacobs will be performing at Performances à la Carte's upcoming concert "HIDDEN TREASURES: The Innas, Ettas, Annas and Donnas of Mozart's Operas." The concert aims to contextualize and dignify the flat and oftentimes restricted female characters of Mozart's operas. (Aubrey Yeo/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Alumna Joanna Lynn-Jacobs will be performing at Performances à la Carte's upcoming concert "HIDDEN TREASURES: The Innas, Ettas, Annas and Donnas of Mozart's Operas." The concert aims to contextualize and dignify the flat and oftentimes restricted female characters of Mozart's operas. (Aubrey Yeo/Daily Bruin senior staff)


Alumna Rosalind Wong will be playing the piano at the Getty Center on Saturday evening for the "Sonnets and Sonatas" lecture-concert series. Wong will perform Jean-Philippe Rameau's song "The Hen," which is traditionally played on the harpsichord. Although the harpsichord rendition manages to effectively sound like a hen's clucking, Wong said she has to put especial care into playing so that she can mimic the sound on the piano. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

‘Animals!’ presents humans’ relationships with animals through music

Two sopranos will meow in perfect tune at the Getty Center on Saturday evening. The performance will take place as a part of the free lecture-concert series “Sonnets and Sonatas,” led by French language and culture professor Laure Murat. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Rosalind Wong will be playing the piano at the Getty Center on Saturday evening for the "Sonnets and Sonatas" lecture-concert series. Wong will perform Jean-Philippe Rameau's song "The Hen," which is traditionally played on the harpsichord. Although the harpsichord rendition manages to effectively sound like a hen's clucking, Wong said she has to put especial care into playing so that she can mimic the sound on the piano. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Alumna Rosalind Wong will be playing the piano at the Getty Center on Saturday evening for the "Sonnets and Sonatas" lecture-concert series. Wong will perform Jean-Philippe Rameau's song "The Hen," which is traditionally played on the harpsichord. Although the harpsichord rendition manages to effectively sound like a hen's clucking, Wong said she has to put especial care into playing so that she can mimic the sound on the piano. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Sholeh Wolpé, UCLA's inaugural writer in residence, has translated the works of several Iranian poets. She said the process requires translators to maintain not only the meaning of a piece's words but also the author's intended message. (Axel Lopez/Daily Bruin)

Iranian writer retains author’s intent when translating poetry

Sholeh Wolpé said translating poetry is like the sky’s reflection in the sea – similar, but never exact. The process of transferring a poem from one language to another requires more than just direct translation, UCLA’s inaugural author-in-residence said. Read more...

Photo: Sholeh Wolpé, UCLA's inaugural writer in residence, has translated the works of several Iranian poets. She said the process requires translators to maintain not only the meaning of a piece's words but also the author's intended message. (Axel Lopez/Daily Bruin)

Sholeh Wolpé, UCLA's inaugural writer in residence, has translated the works of several Iranian poets. She said the process requires translators to maintain not only the meaning of a piece's words but also the author's intended message. (Axel Lopez/Daily Bruin)

Graduate student Guillermo Odeja created his song "Soledad" using Spanish guitar strumming inspired by his grandfather. The song layers the strumming at varying tempos, based off of the seven notes from the contest he entered. (Jenna Nicole Smith/Daily Bruin)

Graduate student incorporates Spanish romance into self-composed song

Guillermo Ojeda began writing his three-minute romantic guitar solo with just seven notes. Ojeda, a graduate student in social welfare, submitted his song “Soledad” to “7 Notes Experiment,” a global contest that encourages musicians from across the world to compose a song of any genre from a given set of seven notes. Read more...

Photo: Graduate student Guillermo Odeja created his song "Soledad" using Spanish guitar strumming inspired by his grandfather. The song layers the strumming at varying tempos, based off of the seven notes from the contest he entered. (Jenna Nicole Smith/Daily Bruin)

Graduate student Guillermo Odeja created his song "Soledad" using Spanish guitar strumming inspired by his grandfather. The song layers the strumming at varying tempos, based off of the seven notes from the contest he entered. (Jenna Nicole Smith/Daily Bruin)