Monday, October 22

The Rooftop Cinema Club screened “The Sandlot” at their downtown location for the second time in the past few months, in their attempt to appeal to millennial audiences. To emphasize the childlike nature of the film, the venue provided oversized versions of children’s games, such as Jenga and Connect Four.
(Nina Young/Daily Bruin)

After Dark: Rooftop screening of ‘The Sandlot’ hits home with nostalgia

Los Angeles’ blend of midnight movies, cult screenings and historic theaters offer late-night scares and childhood nostalgia back in the theater. Join columnist Nina Young as she attends different cult screenings each week to find out why audiences stay out so late after dark. Read more...

Photo: The Rooftop Cinema Club screened “The Sandlot” at their downtown location for the second time in the past few months, in their attempt to appeal to millennial audiences. To emphasize the childlike nature of the film, the venue provided oversized versions of children’s games, such as Jenga and Connect Four. (Nina Young/Daily Bruin)

The Rooftop Cinema Club screened “The Sandlot” at their downtown location for the second time in the past few months, in their attempt to appeal to millennial audiences. To emphasize the childlike nature of the film, the venue provided oversized versions of children’s games, such as Jenga and Connect Four.
(Nina Young/Daily Bruin)

MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

MFA student exhibition merges STEM, art to explore consciousness through senses

“Convolution” explores consciousness through light, sound and the scent of a kombucha scoby. Hosted by UCLA Design Media Arts, the “Convolution” exhibition will feature the works of 11 2019 MFA candidates at the New Wight Gallery in UCLA’s Broad Art Center. Read more...

Photo: MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

MFA student Samuel Congdon is one of the artists participating in Thursday's "Convolution" exhibition. The preview show aims to explore consciousness through senses like slight, smell and sound, integrating technology and performative art. Congdon's piece features glowing pedestals and a musical component, paying homage to past loves. (Amy Dixon/Photo editor)

Liv and Mim Nervo of NERVO will take part in "Office Hours," a series hosted by the Music Industry Committee at UCLA. They are the first artists featured this school year, as the club will be putting effort into talking to more females than they did last year, co-founder David Brik said. (Courtesy of NERVO)

DJ sister-duo NERVO to feature in ‘Office Hours’ music industry series Wednesday

This post was updated Oct. 19 at 12:12 p.m. Grammy-winning artists will provide students with an insider’s look into the music industry. Conversation and a Q&A with DJ sister-duo NERVO will jumpstart the Music Industry Committee at UCLA’s 2018 “Office Hours” series Wednesday at the Jan Popper Theater in the Herb Alpert School of Music. Read more...

Photo: Liv and Mim Nervo of NERVO will take part in "Office Hours," a series hosted by the Music Industry Committee at UCLA. They are the first artists featured this school year, as the club will be putting effort into talking to more females than they did last year, co-founder David Brik said. (Courtesy of NERVO)

Liv and Mim Nervo of NERVO will take part in "Office Hours," a series hosted by the Music Industry Committee at UCLA. They are the first artists featured this school year, as the club will be putting effort into talking to more females than they did last year, co-founder David Brik said. (Courtesy of NERVO)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Production of ‘Steambath,’ raunchy ’70s humor intact, comes to the Odyssey

Purgatory is a steam bath and God is a Puerto Rican attendant in Bruce Jay Friedman’s upcoming play. “Steambath,” which premieres Saturday at the Odyssey Theatre, follows the life and afterlife of protagonist Tandy as he grapples with his own mortality. Read more...

Photo: Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics. (Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Jeff LeBeau, Robert Lesser and alumna Shelby Lauren Barry star in “Steambath,” a comedic play imagining purgatory as a steam bath and God as a Puerto Rican attendant. Although much of the humor may be considered offensive, Barry said she hopes presenting the play unaltered from it’s original production will encourage discourse about the topics.
(Courtesy of Ron Sossi)

Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Spook City: Los Angeles Haunted Hayride’s lofty scares enlivened by local lore

Los Angeles is supposed to be the City of Stars, but once those stars fade, where do they go? Do they stay behind, forever attached to their final location, spooking guests who dare to enter their domain? Read more...

Photo: Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Scare actors roam the grounds of the "Los Angeles Haunted Hayride," a Halloween festival that takes place throughout October in Griffith Park. While the attraction is man-made, the actual land is rumored to be haunted. (Eli Countryman/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Devin Daniels, Ram Eshwar Kaundinya – fourth-year cognitive science student – and Atticus Reynolds (left to right) formed Kune Do, a band that performs both improvisational and composed music. They will perform at "Fowler Out Loud" on Wednesday in the Fowler Museum.  (Courtesy of Ram Eshwar Kaundinya)

Eclectic band to bring Indian, Puerto Rican rhythms to student concerts

Bruce Lee’s martial arts philosophy influences Kune Do, a band which incorporates a multitude of different styles of music. The band was first created by Atticus Reynolds and fourth-year cognitive science student Ram Eshwar Kaundinya when they realized the similarities between traditional Indian rhythms and Puerto Rican rhythms. Read more...

Photo: Devin Daniels, Ram Eshwar Kaundinya – fourth-year cognitive science student – and Atticus Reynolds (left to right) formed Kune Do, a band that performs both improvisational and composed music. They will perform at "Fowler Out Loud" on Wednesday in the Fowler Museum. (Courtesy of Ram Eshwar Kaundinya)

Devin Daniels, Ram Eshwar Kaundinya – fourth-year cognitive science student – and Atticus Reynolds (left to right) formed Kune Do, a band that performs both improvisational and composed music. They will perform at "Fowler Out Loud" on Wednesday in the Fowler Museum.  (Courtesy of Ram Eshwar Kaundinya)

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Professor’s book explores intersectionality of ableism, race through fantasy

Blind demons, demigod twins and werewolves with OCD are referenced in Sami Schalk’s book about bodyminds. Bodymind, the concept of overlap of the body and mind and how they influence each other, is integral to Schalk’s book “Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction.” The work addresses how the idea of bodymind and categories of race, gender and disability are intertwined, arguing that disability studies can help scholars better understand black feminist theory, Schalk said. Read more...

Photo: Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)

Sami Schalk, an assistant professor of gender and women's studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will discuss her book "Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women's Speculative Fiction" on Wednesday in the East Rotunda of Powell Library. (Courtesy of Sami Schalk)