Monday, April 23

Grilliant, which opened Feb. 12 on Lindbrook Drive, offers health-oriented foods such as salads and smoothies. The fire-grilled portobello kabob fell short with its bland flavor and presentation, while more traditional protein options such as the chicken wrap made for a heartier meal. (Raunak Devjani/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Restaurant review: Grilliant

Grilliant takes the brilliance out of Mediterranean food. The new Westwood location opened Feb. 12 on Lindbrook Drive and serves salads, wraps, kabobs and organic smoothies. Read more...

Photo: Grilliant, which opened Feb. 12 on Lindbrook Drive, offers health-oriented foods such as salads and smoothies. The fire-grilled portobello kabob fell short with its bland flavor and presentation, while more traditional protein options such as the chicken wrap made for a heartier meal. (Raunak Devjani/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Grilliant, which opened Feb. 12 on Lindbrook Drive, offers health-oriented foods such as salads and smoothies. The fire-grilled portobello kabob fell short with its bland flavor and presentation, while more traditional protein options such as the chicken wrap made for a heartier meal. (Raunak Devjani/Daily Bruin senior staff)




Alumna Kay Mouradian wrote a novel and released a documentary describing her mother's experiences during the Armenian Genocide, both titled "My Mother's Voice." (Courtesy of Kay Mouradian)

Alumna’s book shines light on forgotten history of Armenian genocide

Kay Mouradian’s mother survived the Armenian genocide at the age of 14. However, while Mouradian heard stories of her mother’s experiences as a child, the alumna wouldn’t really learn about the details of the horrific event until she began writing a book on the subject called “My Mother’s Voice” in her 50s. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Kay Mouradian wrote a novel and released a documentary describing her mother's experiences during the Armenian Genocide, both titled "My Mother's Voice." (Courtesy of Kay Mouradian)

Alumna Kay Mouradian wrote a novel and released a documentary describing her mother's experiences during the Armenian Genocide, both titled "My Mother's Voice." (Courtesy of Kay Mouradian)

Fourth-year political science student Libby Burke began stamping her designs on T-shirts during the summer of 2017, and she now sells them at her online store, Ides. The company's website features designs like her "U Can Learn A lot" design, her most popular pattern and a nod to her education at UCLA. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Student turns pastime into her hand-printed T-shirt business

Libby Burke’s hand-printed T-shirt designs include stalks of broccoli and dogs in capes. After doodling extensively in notebooks, the fourth-year political science student said she decided to transition into the more skill-oriented medium of T-shirt printing. Read more...

Photo: Fourth-year political science student Libby Burke began stamping her designs on T-shirts during the summer of 2017, and she now sells them at her online store, Ides. The company's website features designs like her "U Can Learn A lot" design, her most popular pattern and a nod to her education at UCLA. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Fourth-year political science student Libby Burke began stamping her designs on T-shirts during the summer of 2017, and she now sells them at her online store, Ides. The company's website features designs like her "U Can Learn A lot" design, her most popular pattern and a nod to her education at UCLA. (Joe Akira/Daily Bruin)

Professor William Bodiford and third-year civil and environmental engineering student Sidney Poon practice with leather-covered wood swords known as fukuro shinai. The Kashima-Shinryu Club at UCLA meets to refine and perfect combat techniques of the 500-year-old Japanese martial art. (Photos by Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin Photo illustration by Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

Japanese martial art fights stress, promotes cultural awareness

Kashima-Shinryu equips its practitioners with skills to face off against cavalrymen and giant savage boars. However, since giant boars rarely terrorize UCLA students on their daily commutes to class, some practitioners on campus have found other uses for the Japanese martial art. Read more...

Photo: Professor William Bodiford and third-year civil and environmental engineering student Sidney Poon practice with leather-covered wood swords known as fukuro shinai. The Kashima-Shinryu Club at UCLA meets to refine and perfect combat techniques of the 500-year-old Japanese martial art. (Photos by Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin Photo illustration by Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)

Professor William Bodiford and third-year civil and environmental engineering student Sidney Poon practice with leather-covered wood swords known as fukuro shinai. The Kashima-Shinryu Club at UCLA meets to refine and perfect combat techniques of the 500-year-old Japanese martial art. (Photos by Alexandra Del Rosario/Daily Bruin Photo illustration by Amy Dixon/Assistant Photo editor)


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