Saturday, August 24

Meghan He will model in the Fashion and Student Trends runway show Thursday. He, a first-year psychobiology student, joined FAST with no previous modeling experience. She began the year by practicing her walk in a dorm hallway, and then in FAST rehearsal spaces like Drake Stadium. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

Models reflect on catwalk experiences preparing for FAST runway show

Heels click on concrete, synced with music, as Meghan He pops a hand on her hip and smizes out across the stairs of Drake Stadium. He, a first-year psychobiology student began the school year catwalking down her dorm hallway. Read more...

Photo: Meghan He will model in the Fashion and Student Trends runway show Thursday. He, a first-year psychobiology student, joined FAST with no previous modeling experience. She began the year by practicing her walk in a dorm hallway, and then in FAST rehearsal spaces like Drake Stadium. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

Meghan He will model in the Fashion and Student Trends runway show Thursday. He, a first-year psychobiology student, joined FAST with no previous modeling experience. She began the year by practicing her walk in a dorm hallway, and then in FAST rehearsal spaces like Drake Stadium. (Ashley Kenney/Daily Bruin)

First-year biology student Sabrina Costa aimed to design a clothing line meant to appeal to students through functionality while incorporating bold touches. Her designs were inspired by the 2018 Met Gala theme, "Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination," and more specifically by Kim Kardashian's shimmery gold dress. The outfits will be featured at the 2019 Fashion and Student Trends at UCLA Runway Show on Thursday. (Xuxin Zhang/Daily Bruin)

Functionality grounds glamour in student’s clothing line inspired by Met Gala outfits

Sabrina Costa is bringing fashion from the Metropolitan Museum of Art to Pauley Pavilion. The first-year biology student’s clothing line for the 2019 Fashion and Student Trends at UCLA runway show was inspired by the 2018 Met Gala theme, “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination.” Costa’s collection consists of dresses, skirts and a pair of shorts, with the main source of inspiration being Kim Kardashian’s shimmery gold dress. Read more...

Photo: First-year biology student Sabrina Costa aimed to design a clothing line meant to appeal to students through functionality while incorporating bold touches. Her designs were inspired by the 2018 Met Gala theme, "Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination," and more specifically by Kim Kardashian's shimmery gold dress. The outfits will be featured at the 2019 Fashion and Student Trends at UCLA Runway Show on Thursday. (Xuxin Zhang/Daily Bruin)

First-year biology student Sabrina Costa aimed to design a clothing line meant to appeal to students through functionality while incorporating bold touches. Her designs were inspired by the 2018 Met Gala theme, "Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination," and more specifically by Kim Kardashian's shimmery gold dress. The outfits will be featured at the 2019 Fashion and Student Trends at UCLA Runway Show on Thursday. (Xuxin Zhang/Daily Bruin)

Caliope Marin, a third-year neuroscience and human biology and society student, and Risachi Ogan, a fourth-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student, said they designed Curvy in Color to inspire female empowerment and inclusivity in fashion. (Liz Ketcham/Assistant Photo editor)

Students hope to empower by embracing cultures, body positivity in fashion line

Last year, Caliope Marin and Risachi Ogan walked the runway at an annual fashion show. This year, they designed the clothes instead of wearing them. Marin, a third-year neuroscience and human biology and society student, and Ogan, a fourth-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student, said they witnessed a lack of body-type diversity in the 2018 Fashion and Student Trends at UCLA fashion show. Read more...

Photo: Caliope Marin, a third-year neuroscience and human biology and society student, and Risachi Ogan, a fourth-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student, said they designed Curvy in Color to inspire female empowerment and inclusivity in fashion. (Liz Ketcham/Assistant Photo editor)

Caliope Marin, a third-year neuroscience and human biology and society student, and Risachi Ogan, a fourth-year molecular, cell and developmental biology student, said they designed Curvy in Color to inspire female empowerment and inclusivity in fashion. (Liz Ketcham/Assistant Photo editor)

Suchita Kumar, a second-year physiological science student, said her fashion line, "Shaila," was inspired by memories of going through her mother’s closet when she was younger. The pieces showcase repurposed children's clothes mixed with current trends, with outfits spanning from casual wear to evening attire. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

Drawing on childhood memories, student’s fashion line spans time and melds cultures

After some tweaking, styles from Gap Kids can also suit adults. Suchita Kumar, a second-year physiological science student, said she designed a fashion line fusing children’s wear with late 20th-century trends. Read more...

Photo: Suchita Kumar, a second-year physiological science student, said her fashion line, "Shaila," was inspired by memories of going through her mother’s closet when she was younger. The pieces showcase repurposed children's clothes mixed with current trends, with outfits spanning from casual wear to evening attire. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

Suchita Kumar, a second-year physiological science student, said her fashion line, "Shaila," was inspired by memories of going through her mother’s closet when she was younger. The pieces showcase repurposed children's clothes mixed with current trends, with outfits spanning from casual wear to evening attire. (Kanishka Mehra/Daily Bruin)

Josephine Qi, a first-year pre-economics student, designed her clothing line, "Pisces," by combining themes of both fish and the stars. Her designs will be showcased at this year's Fashion and Student Trends fashion show. (Photo by Tanmay Shankar/Illustration by Emily Dembinski)

Mundane items meet student’s design to form clothing line inspired by fish, stars

Josephine Qi designed her first clothing line, “Pisces,” based on fish and stars because she found the concept amusing.   The first-year pre-economics student first developed the idea after seeing a young boy’s shirt featuring fish heads attached to human legs, and she later designed a fish-centric line in high school. Read more...

Photo: Josephine Qi, a first-year pre-economics student, designed her clothing line, "Pisces," by combining themes of both fish and the stars. Her designs will be showcased at this year's Fashion and Student Trends fashion show. (Photo by Tanmay Shankar/Illustration by Emily Dembinski)

Josephine Qi, a first-year pre-economics student, designed her clothing line, "Pisces," by combining themes of both fish and the stars. Her designs will be showcased at this year's Fashion and Student Trends fashion show. (Photo by Tanmay Shankar/Illustration by Emily Dembinski)

UCLA students founded NEED Westwood, a delivery company for the campus community. Couriers deliver items via electric scooters, allowing them to minimize traffic time and complete orders within an hour. The UCLA-based employees are also less likely to get lost en route. Guayakí Yerba Mate and Double Stuf Oreos are popular among customers' orders, which can be placed via NEED's website. (Daanish Bhatti/Daily Bruin)

Delivery service NEED Westwood rides into UCLA, but on electric scooters

Students should only worry about taking exams – not getting the blue books needed for them, said Angel Herrera. Co-founded in 2019 by the third-year theater student alongside his friends, second-year economics and philosophy student David Lin and second-year film student Rohun Vora, NEED Westwood features student couriers completing delivery services on electric scooters. Read more...

Photo: UCLA students founded NEED Westwood, a delivery company for the campus community. Couriers deliver items via electric scooters, allowing them to minimize traffic time and complete orders within an hour. The UCLA-based employees are also less likely to get lost en route. Guayakí Yerba Mate and Double Stuf Oreos are popular among customers' orders, which can be placed via NEED's website. (Daanish Bhatti/Daily Bruin)

UCLA students founded NEED Westwood, a delivery company for the campus community. Couriers deliver items via electric scooters, allowing them to minimize traffic time and complete orders within an hour. The UCLA-based employees are also less likely to get lost en route. Guayakí Yerba Mate and Double Stuf Oreos are popular among customers' orders, which can be placed via NEED's website. (Daanish Bhatti/Daily Bruin)



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