Tuesday, February 19

On the Netflix series "YOU," Joe Goldberg (Penn Badgley) is a local bookstore manager who stalks, kidnaps and murders in an attempt to woo his love interest. Dangerous characters like Joe have been fetishized by fans on Twitter, potentially perpetuating abusive behavior. (Courtesy of Netflix)

Second Take: When fans don’t distinguish actors from characters, they start swooning over criminals

A dozen roses used to be a romantic gesture. But they no longer seem to be the way to a girl’s heart. Instead, recent trends in television and film suggest that menacing stalkers, and even killers, might constitute modern romance. Read more...

Photo: On the Netflix series "YOU," Joe Goldberg (Penn Badgley) is a local bookstore manager who stalks, kidnaps and murders in an attempt to woo his love interest. Dangerous characters like Joe have been fetishized by fans on Twitter, potentially perpetuating abusive behavior. (Courtesy of Netflix)

On the Netflix series "YOU," Joe Goldberg (Penn Badgley) is a local bookstore manager who stalks, kidnaps and murders in an attempt to woo his love interest. Dangerous characters like Joe have been fetishized by fans on Twitter, potentially perpetuating abusive behavior. (Courtesy of Netflix)

Former NFL tight end Colton Underwood has been dubbed “The First Virgin Bachelor.” The reality show has a more complicated history with sexuality, which the hyper-fixation on Underwood’s virginity plays into. 
(Courtesy of Craig Sjodin/ABC)

Second Take: ‘The Bachelor’ promotes toxic double standards of sexuality

They say “sex sells,” but it seems like a lack of sex is what’s selling the latest season of “The Bachelor.” Colton Underwood – who has dubbed himself “The First Virgin Bachelor” – is a personable former NFL tight end who was just tangled in a love triangle with two girls on the latest seasons of “The Bachelorette” and “Bachelor in Paradise.” In other words, he’s not exactly what most people picture when they hear the words “27-year-old virgin.” It would be hard to argue that “The Bachelor” reflects reality, despite its label as reality television. Read more...

Photo: Former NFL tight end Colton Underwood has been dubbed “The First Virgin Bachelor.” The reality show has a more complicated history with sexuality, which the hyper-fixation on Underwood’s virginity plays into. (Courtesy of Craig Sjodin/ABC)

Former NFL tight end Colton Underwood has been dubbed “The First Virgin Bachelor.” The reality show has a more complicated history with sexuality, which the hyper-fixation on Underwood’s virginity plays into. 
(Courtesy of Craig Sjodin/ABC)


Maya Montañez Smukler, wrote "Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema." The UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program will present a film-archive series based on the book. (Courtesy of Art Streiber)

Film archive series to shed light on Hollywood’s unrecognized female directors

This post was updated Jan. 26 at 7:08 a.m. From the mid-1930s until the mid-1960s, there were only two female directors in Hollywood: Dorothy Arzner and Ida Lupino. Read more...

Photo: Maya Montañez Smukler, wrote "Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema." The UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program will present a film-archive series based on the book. (Courtesy of Art Streiber)

Maya Montañez Smukler, wrote "Liberating Hollywood: Women Directors and the Feminist Reform of 1970s American Cinema." The UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program will present a film-archive series based on the book. (Courtesy of Art Streiber)


UCLA alumnus Roger Suen worked on "Ms. Purple," which will premier at the Sundance Film Festival, scoring the film from the very start, rather than as a post-production task. (Courtesy of Annie Bang)

Creative work of UCLA alumni to shine at 2019 Sundance Film Festival

This year’s Sundance Film Festival will feature the work of myriad artists and content creators, a few of whom were educated at UCLA. From music scores to documentary, the Daily Bruin examines the work of three alumni premiering at the festival. Read more...

Photo: UCLA alumnus Roger Suen worked on "Ms. Purple," which will premier at the Sundance Film Festival, scoring the film from the very start, rather than as a post-production task. (Courtesy of Annie Bang)

UCLA alumnus Roger Suen worked on "Ms. Purple," which will premier at the Sundance Film Festival, scoring the film from the very start, rather than as a post-production task. (Courtesy of Annie Bang)

Erik Aadahl co-founded E Squared, an award-winning sound design company that has worked on films including "Argo," "A Quiet Place" and "Kung Fu Panda." Aadahl will be the main speaker at a campus event Tuesday, where he will discuss the multistep process of sound design with students. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

‘A Quiet Place,’ ‘Argo’ sound editor to discuss inventive art of audio creation

When a tree falls in a movie, and the audience needs to hear it, a dedicated team of experts is there to ensure that it makes a sound. Read more...

Photo: Erik Aadahl co-founded E Squared, an award-winning sound design company that has worked on films including "Argo," "A Quiet Place" and "Kung Fu Panda." Aadahl will be the main speaker at a campus event Tuesday, where he will discuss the multistep process of sound design with students. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)

Erik Aadahl co-founded E Squared, an award-winning sound design company that has worked on films including "Argo," "A Quiet Place" and "Kung Fu Panda." Aadahl will be the main speaker at a campus event Tuesday, where he will discuss the multistep process of sound design with students. (Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin)