Monday, November 12

(Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff) Four animal rights groups, Progress for Science, In Defense of Animals, Los Angeles for Animals and Liberation Los Angeles gathered Friday for a protest against UCLA’s use of animals in research laboratories. UCLA has faced pressure from the animal-rights community for years. Activists dropped an explosive package onto the car of a researcher who used primates in his studies on schizophrenia and drug addiction in 2009.

Activists protest UCLA’s use of animals in laboratory research at Murphy Hall

An animal rights protester at UCLA flipped over his dog’s scarred ear to reveal a black tattoo that was used to identify him as a test animal in a cosmetics laboratory. Read more...

Photo: (Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff) Four animal rights groups, Progress for Science, In Defense of Animals, Los Angeles for Animals and Liberation Los Angeles gathered Friday for a protest against UCLA’s use of animals in research laboratories. UCLA has faced pressure from the animal-rights community for years. Activists dropped an explosive package onto the car of a researcher who used primates in his studies on schizophrenia and drug addiction in 2009.

(Ken Shin/Daily Bruin staff) Four animal rights groups, Progress for Science, In Defense of Animals, Los Angeles for Animals and Liberation Los Angeles gathered Friday for a protest against UCLA’s use of animals in research laboratories. UCLA has faced pressure from the animal-rights community for years. Activists dropped an explosive package onto the car of a researcher who used primates in his studies on schizophrenia and drug addiction in 2009.

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New study uses Google search history to track syphilis outbreaks

Google’s search history data can be used to target ads, personalize websites and now, according to UCLA researchers, track the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. Sean Young, an associate professor at UCLA and executive director of the University of California Institute for Prediction Technology, collaborated with researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a new way to monitor the spread of syphilis using search data from Google Trends. Read more...

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Daniel Blumstein, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project in the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots. (Photo by Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin, Illustration by Evan Charfauros/Daily Bruin)

UCLA professor heads long-term evolutionary biology project on marmots

Daniel Blumstein’s office is filled with marmot souvenirs, ranging from a “marmot-Xing” sign, to marmot T-shirts and memes, to a casino advertisement featuring a marmot. Blumstein, a UCLA ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots, including marmot alarm calls, environmental conservation and the evolution of animal behavior. Read more...

Photo: Daniel Blumstein, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project in the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots. (Photo by Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin, Illustration by Evan Charfauros/Daily Bruin)

Daniel Blumstein, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project in the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots. (Photo by Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin, Illustration by Evan Charfauros/Daily Bruin)


Posdoctoral researchers used sheep brains to explain neuroscience to middle and high school students at Brain Awareness Week at UCLA from Monday to Friday. (Teddy Rosenbluth/Daily Bruin)

UCLA holds Brain Awareness Week for middle and high school students

A UCLA postdoctoral researcher displayed a sheep brain in front of 30 middle schoolers while explaining the organ’s importance at an event last week. “If you get a liver transplant or a kidney transplant or even a heart transplant, you would be the same person,” said Marcus Otero, a neuroscience researcher. Read more...

Photo: Posdoctoral researchers used sheep brains to explain neuroscience to middle and high school students at Brain Awareness Week at UCLA from Monday to Friday. (Teddy Rosenbluth/Daily Bruin)

Posdoctoral researchers used sheep brains to explain neuroscience to middle and high school students at Brain Awareness Week at UCLA from Monday to Friday. (Teddy Rosenbluth/Daily Bruin)

(Daily Bruin file photo) In a study published Feb. 27, researchers found the same proteins that prevent some patients from responding well to antidepressants might make them respond better to ECT.

Study finds link between proteins, electroconversion therapy response

UCLA researchers have found a way to predict how individuals with depression will respond to electroconvulsive therapy, a common treatment for the disorder. In electroconvulsive therapy, doctors stimulate the patient’s brain with electrical pulses while they are under anesthesia. Read more...

Photo: (Daily Bruin file photo) In a study published Feb. 27, researchers found the same proteins that prevent some patients from responding well to antidepressants might make them respond better to ECT.

(Daily Bruin file photo) In a study published Feb. 27, researchers found the same proteins that prevent some patients from responding well to antidepressants might make them respond better to ECT.