Thursday, April 26

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New study uses Google search history to track syphilis outbreaks

Google’s search history data can be used to target ads, personalize websites and now, according to UCLA researchers, track the spread of sexually transmitted diseases. Sean Young, an associate professor at UCLA and executive director of the University of California Institute for Prediction Technology, collaborated with researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to develop a new way to monitor the spread of syphilis using search data from Google Trends. Read more...

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Daniel Blumstein, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project in the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots. (Photo by Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin, Illustration by Evan Charfauros/Daily Bruin)

UCLA professor heads long-term evolutionary biology project on marmots

Daniel Blumstein’s office is filled with marmot souvenirs, ranging from a “marmot-Xing” sign, to marmot T-shirts and memes, to a casino advertisement featuring a marmot. Blumstein, a UCLA ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots, including marmot alarm calls, environmental conservation and the evolution of animal behavior. Read more...

Daniel Blumstein, an ecology and evolutionary biology professor and head of the Marmot Project in the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, studies a range of topics through his research on marmots. (Photo by Niveda Tennety/Daily Bruin, Illustration by Evan Charfauros/Daily Bruin)

(Illustration by Thomas Tran/Daily Bruin)
(Illustration by Thomas Tran/Daily Bruin)

Posdoctoral researchers used sheep brains to explain neuroscience to middle and high school students at Brain Awareness Week at UCLA from Monday to Friday. (Teddy Rosenbluth/Daily Bruin)
Posdoctoral researchers used sheep brains to explain neuroscience to middle and high school students at Brain Awareness Week at UCLA from Monday to Friday. (Teddy Rosenbluth/Daily Bruin)

(Daily Bruin file photo) In a study published Feb. 27, researchers found the same proteins that prevent some patients from responding well to antidepressants might make them respond better to ECT.
(Daily Bruin file photo) In a study published Feb. 27, researchers found the same proteins that prevent some patients from responding well to antidepressants might make them respond better to ECT.

(Olivia Chen/Daily Bruin)
(Olivia Chen/Daily Bruin)

A UCLA study found that individuals who had experienced ethnic discrimination had shorter sleep duration and worse sleep quality. (Eda Gokcebay/Daily Bruin)

UCLA study finds poor sleep quality linked to ethnic discrimination

UCLA researchers have found that teenagers who face ethnic discrimination sleep less than those who do not. In a study published last month, researchers at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior and the Clinical and Translational Science Institute interviewed hundreds of high school students of different ethnic backgrounds, asking them if they agreed with statements such as “people act as if they’re afraid of you” and “you receive poorer service at restaurants and stores” to assess whether they had experienced discrimination. Read more...

A UCLA study found that individuals who had experienced ethnic discrimination had shorter sleep duration and worse sleep quality. (Eda Gokcebay/Daily Bruin)