Saturday, September 22

UCLA researchers 3D printed tissue that could be used in implants. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)
UCLA researchers 3D printed tissue that could be used in implants. (Courtesy of UCLA Newsroom)

The UCLA Healthy Campus Initiative invited Manal Aboelata, managing director at Prevention Institute, and Marco Iacoboni, professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences and director of a neurology lab at UCLA, to speak about the significance of altruism. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)
The UCLA Healthy Campus Initiative invited Manal Aboelata, managing director at Prevention Institute, and Marco Iacoboni, professor of psychiatry and biobehavioral sciences and director of a neurology lab at UCLA, to speak about the significance of altruism. (Isa Saalabi/Daily Bruin)

Researchers at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior examined a group of 35 middle-aged and older adults and found a correlation between increased sedentary behavior and reduced thickness of the medial temporal lobe, a region of the brain critical for memory formation. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Researchers find correlation between sedentary behavior and the brain

UCLA researchers found that individuals who spend too much time sitting down may be more likely to have memory impairment and Alzheimer’s disease. In a study published Thursday, researchers at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior examined a group of 35 middle-aged and older adults and found a correlation between increased sedentary behavior and reduced thickness of the medial temporal lobe, a region of the brain critical for memory formation. Read more...

Researchers at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior examined a group of 35 middle-aged and older adults and found a correlation between increased sedentary behavior and reduced thickness of the medial temporal lobe, a region of the brain critical for memory formation. (Daily Bruin file photo)

(Anh-Vy Pham/Daily Bruin)
(Anh-Vy Pham/Daily Bruin)

The Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference 2018, held in Ackerman Grand Ballroom by the Institute of Applied and Pure Mathematics, aimed to open a discussion surrounding the Latinx academic community. (Farida Saleh/Daily Bruin)
The Latinx in the Mathematical Sciences Conference 2018, held in Ackerman Grand Ballroom by the Institute of Applied and Pure Mathematics, aimed to open a discussion surrounding the Latinx academic community. (Farida Saleh/Daily Bruin)

A nonprofit organization released a report last week showing more than 70 percent of faculty at California public colleges are white, and about 70 percent of UC students are nonwhite. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Study shows discrepancy between diversity in college faculty, students

A report released last week found faculty at California public colleges were about a third less racially diverse than their students. The Campaign for College Opportunity collected data on student enrollment in the University of California, California State University and California Community College systems and found more than two thirds of students enrolled in the 2016-2017 school year identified as nonwhite, while more than two thirds of faculty and leadership are white. Read more...

A nonprofit organization released a report last week showing more than 70 percent of faculty at California public colleges are white, and about 70 percent of UC students are nonwhite. (Daily Bruin file photo)

Panelists at the event said they are optimistic the cannabis industry will be integrated into society, but are unsure of how it will develop in Los Angeles. (Liz Ketcham/Daily Bruin)

Panelists smoke out pros and cons of marijuana legalization

Experts said the legalization of recreational cannabis could increase tax revenue and facilitate discussion between patients and doctors about marijuana use. Politicians, medical researchers and economic analysts reviewed economic and medical implications of California’s recent legalization of marijuana at an event at UCLA on Thursday. Read more...

Panelists at the event said they are optimistic the cannabis industry will be integrated into society, but are unsure of how it will develop in Los Angeles. (Liz Ketcham/Daily Bruin)