Tuesday, August 20

Cake and Art sells elaborate and expensive custom cake shapes that feature celebrities such as Angelina Jolie and characters like the Mad Hatter. It also sells a small selection of cupcakes for less expensive prices, but offers no seating at the shop. (Alyssa Dorn/Daily Bruin staff)

Boulevard Bites: Inconsistent quality eclipses original flavors of Cake and Art

Finding a delicious restaurant in Los Angeles can be difficult amongst the city’s thousands of dining options. To help readers narrow down their search, the Daily Bruin will review restaurants located along main street boulevards near UCLA each week. Read more...

Photo: Cake and Art sells elaborate and expensive custom cake shapes that feature celebrities such as Angelina Jolie and characters like the Mad Hatter. It also sells a small selection of cupcakes for less expensive prices, but offers no seating at the shop. (Alyssa Dorn/Daily Bruin staff)

Cake and Art sells elaborate and expensive custom cake shapes that feature celebrities such as Angelina Jolie and characters like the Mad Hatter. It also sells a small selection of cupcakes for less expensive prices, but offers no seating at the shop. (Alyssa Dorn/Daily Bruin staff)


Italian and comparative literature professor Massimo Ciavolella inspired a character in Umberto Eco's book. The 1986 movie adaptation of the book will be screened at UCLA. (Courtesy of Brett Landenberger)

Q&A: UCLA professor talks inspiring a character in a 1980 Italian novel

Italian professor Massimo Ciavolella and the late Italian author Umberto Eco were good acquaintances. Ciavolella invited Eco to lecture during the professor’s classes at UCLA. Eco made Ciavolella a character in his book “Il nome della rosa,” or “The Name of the Rose.” The novel details a series of murders that take place at a Benedictine monastery in 1327. Read more...

Photo: Italian and comparative literature professor Massimo Ciavolella inspired a character in Umberto Eco's book. The 1986 movie adaptation of the book will be screened at UCLA. (Courtesy of Brett Landenberger)

Italian and comparative literature professor Massimo Ciavolella inspired a character in Umberto Eco's book. The 1986 movie adaptation of the book will be screened at UCLA. (Courtesy of Brett Landenberger)


Tamara Hunter worked on the casting of Golden Globe-nominated film "Hidden Figures," a story about three mathematicians who defied race and gender boundaries. (Courtesy of Tamara Hunter)

Q&A: Alum, casting director Tamara Hunter discusses work on ‘Hidden Figures’

Tamara Hunter casts characters who are capable of extraordinary feats. She’s worked in the casting department on such films as “The Avengers” and “Guardians of the Galaxy.” But for “Hidden Figures” she assembled a cast to play the mathematicians behind the task that was once considered impossible – sending a man into space. Read more...

Photo: Tamara Hunter worked on the casting of Golden Globe-nominated film "Hidden Figures," a story about three mathematicians who defied race and gender boundaries. (Courtesy of Tamara Hunter)

Tamara Hunter worked on the casting of Golden Globe-nominated film "Hidden Figures," a story about three mathematicians who defied race and gender boundaries. (Courtesy of Tamara Hunter)


(Courtesy of Hopper Stone/20th Century Fox)

Movie Review: ‘Hidden Figures’

“Hidden Figures” may lack CGI explosions and action-packed fight scenes, but make no mistake – it’s a superhero film. The film relies on the conventional biopic formula – hardship and triumph, based on a true story – but manages to refresh the genre with its powerful narrative, complex performances, comprehensive understanding of discrimination and bold cinematography. Read more...

Photo: (Courtesy of Hopper Stone/20th Century Fox)

(Courtesy of Hopper Stone/20th Century Fox)