Wednesday, November 21

Fourth-year world arts and cultures/dance student Timna Naim (pictured) added foam masks to their performance pieces, instead of clay, by collaborating with faculty member Kevin Myers.  Naim used the masks to combine visual arts with bodily movement like contemporary dance and was inspired by Habonim Dror, a Jewish summer camp, which Naim attended from 2006 to 2012. (Justine Sto. Tomas/Video producer)

Collecting Creatives: Student fuses ceramics, dance to unveil the complexities of identity

Timna Naim wears masks during dance performances not to hide but to celebrate self-identity. A fourth-year world arts and cultures/dancestudent, Naim has combined dance and ceramics as a vehicle for expressing their self-identity as an Israeli-American genderqueer gay male-bodied individual, they said. Read more...

Photo: Fourth-year world arts and cultures/dance student Timna Naim (pictured) added foam masks to their performance pieces, instead of clay, by collaborating with faculty member Kevin Myers. Naim used the masks to combine visual arts with bodily movement like contemporary dance and was inspired by Habonim Dror, a Jewish summer camp, which Naim attended from 2006 to 2012. (Justine Sto. Tomas/Video producer)

Fourth-year world arts and cultures/dance student Timna Naim (pictured) added foam masks to their performance pieces, instead of clay, by collaborating with faculty member Kevin Myers.  Naim used the masks to combine visual arts with bodily movement like contemporary dance and was inspired by Habonim Dror, a Jewish summer camp, which Naim attended from 2006 to 2012. (Justine Sto. Tomas/Video producer)

Curatorial and research associate Gassia Armenian organized "Joli! A Fancy Masquerade," an exhibit at the Fowler Museum displaying 11 West African headdresses created during the 1970s. The headdresses – which feature patterned fabrics, colorful textiles and intricate ornaments – were created from leftover fabrics of gowns, dresses and curtains during the British colonization of the state of Sierra Leone. (Pinkie Su/Daily Bruin)

UCLA’s Fowler Museum displays 20th-century West African headdresses

Walking into the Fowler Museum’s latest installation is like stepping into a time machine to 20th-century Freetown, Sierra Leone. “Did you bring your passport with you?” said curator Gassia Armenian as she led me toward the exhibition, “Joli! Read more...

Photo: Curatorial and research associate Gassia Armenian organized "Joli! A Fancy Masquerade," an exhibit at the Fowler Museum displaying 11 West African headdresses created during the 1970s. The headdresses – which feature patterned fabrics, colorful textiles and intricate ornaments – were created from leftover fabrics of gowns, dresses and curtains during the British colonization of the state of Sierra Leone. (Pinkie Su/Daily Bruin)

Curatorial and research associate Gassia Armenian organized "Joli! A Fancy Masquerade," an exhibit at the Fowler Museum displaying 11 West African headdresses created during the 1970s. The headdresses – which feature patterned fabrics, colorful textiles and intricate ornaments – were created from leftover fabrics of gowns, dresses and curtains during the British colonization of the state of Sierra Leone. (Pinkie Su/Daily Bruin)

On-campus arts and culture publication Kiwi Magazine, founded by third-year art student Paulina Thai, offers contributors the chance to submit writing and art relating to a specific theme. Kiwi Magazine's latest theme is "Wet." (Courtesy of Pauline Thai)

Student juices up artists’ creative expressions with Kiwi Magazine

Pauline Thai opened the minifridge in her Canyon Point dorm for a snack when her gaze fell upon a kiwi. In that instant, she realized she had finally found the perfect name for her art magazine. Read more...

Photo: On-campus arts and culture publication Kiwi Magazine, founded by third-year art student Paulina Thai, offers contributors the chance to submit writing and art relating to a specific theme. Kiwi Magazine's latest theme is "Wet." (Courtesy of Pauline Thai)

On-campus arts and culture publication Kiwi Magazine, founded by third-year art student Paulina Thai, offers contributors the chance to submit writing and art relating to a specific theme. Kiwi Magazine's latest theme is "Wet." (Courtesy of Pauline Thai)

Alumna Nia Andrews was not confident in her musical abilities while in school, but after graduating she sang at rapper Common’s shows and recorded for Solange Knowles’ 2016 album. (Dayoung Lee/Daily Bruin)

Singer-songwriter Nia Andrews finds voice in work with Lauryn Hill, Solange

Nia Andrews was grinding cardamom pods to make homemade chai tea when Solange Knowles texted her, inviting her to record. The UCLA alumna turned professional singer-songwriter poured her tea into a tumbler and headed to a Los Angeles studio to record the interlude “I Got So Much Magic You Can Have It,” which appears on Knowles’s 2016 album “A Seat at the Table.” Andrews now uses her musical talents to create and perform music of her own. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Nia Andrews was not confident in her musical abilities while in school, but after graduating she sang at rapper Common’s shows and recorded for Solange Knowles’ 2016 album. (Dayoung Lee/Daily Bruin)

Alumna Nia Andrews was not confident in her musical abilities while in school, but after graduating she sang at rapper Common’s shows and recorded for Solange Knowles’ 2016 album. (Dayoung Lee/Daily Bruin)

Nilo Goldfarb, Penelope Uribe-Abee, Oscar Peña and Gabe Pine (left to right) are four of twenty-eight undergraduate students that won an art scholarship in spring. The students' work will be displayed in the Broad Art Center until December. (Frank To/Daily Bruin)

UCLA art scholarship winners exhibit works through variety of mediums

UCLA art faculty awarded the art department’s Undergraduate Art Scholarship award in spring to 28 student artists whose works range in medium from photography to ceramics to sculpture to film. Read more...

Photo: Nilo Goldfarb, Penelope Uribe-Abee, Oscar Peña and Gabe Pine (left to right) are four of twenty-eight undergraduate students that won an art scholarship in spring. The students' work will be displayed in the Broad Art Center until December. (Frank To/Daily Bruin)

Nilo Goldfarb, Penelope Uribe-Abee, Oscar Peña and Gabe Pine (left to right) are four of twenty-eight undergraduate students that won an art scholarship in spring. The students' work will be displayed in the Broad Art Center until December. (Frank To/Daily Bruin)



1 4 5 6