Wednesday, February 20

Alumna Gretchen McNeil's upcoming novel "#MurderTrending" takes place in a future where government-sanctioned executions are livestreamed via an app. Meant to serve as a commentary on the impact of social media, McNeil said the books reveals how the internet can magnify society's worst impulses. The young adult novel will be released Tuesday. 
(Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Alumna weaves together comedy, gore in new tale of mob mentality in social media

A double doorbell notification from an app, humorously referencing “The Postman Always Rings Twice,” signals gruesome death in Gretchen McNeil’s new book “#MurderTrending.” Huddled at her desk for nine weeks, the UCLA alumna said she produced a seemingly simple narrative following a teenager wrongly convicted of murder, layering it with broader commentary about the omnipresence of social media. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Gretchen McNeil's upcoming novel "#MurderTrending" takes place in a future where government-sanctioned executions are livestreamed via an app. Meant to serve as a commentary on the impact of social media, McNeil said the books reveals how the internet can magnify society's worst impulses. The young adult novel will be released Tuesday. (Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Daily Bruin senior staff)

Alumna Gretchen McNeil's upcoming novel "#MurderTrending" takes place in a future where government-sanctioned executions are livestreamed via an app. Meant to serve as a commentary on the impact of social media, McNeil said the books reveals how the internet can magnify society's worst impulses. The young adult novel will be released Tuesday. 
(Kristie-Valerie Hoang/Daily Bruin senior staff)

(Courtesy of RCA Records)

Album review: ‘Liberation’

Christina Aguilera’s “Liberation” aims to paint a picture of female empowerment, but leaves listeners with a muddled image instead. Six years after the release of her pop-driven album “Lotus,” Aguilera hearkens back to the R&B and soul influence that characterizes her earlier work, also layering in more modern elements, such as trap beats reminiscent of Migos’ music. Read more...

Photo: (Courtesy of RCA Records)

(Courtesy of RCA Records)

Alumna Ana Fernandez paints everyday scenes from around San Antonio. In "Collier Pool," she captures a Latino family going for a swim in a public pool. (Courtesy of Ana Fernandez)

UCLA alumna’s paintings of everyday life featured in San Antonio gallery

Ana Fernandez and her “chili queens” dish out Tex-Mex food from her San Antonio food truck, Chamoy City Limits. The truck has also become a source of inspiration for Fernandez’s paintings. Read more...

Photo: Alumna Ana Fernandez paints everyday scenes from around San Antonio. In "Collier Pool," she captures a Latino family going for a swim in a public pool. (Courtesy of Ana Fernandez)

Alumna Ana Fernandez paints everyday scenes from around San Antonio. In "Collier Pool," she captures a Latino family going for a swim in a public pool. (Courtesy of Ana Fernandez)

Student-run art organization Graphite accepts entries to their journal and online platform, ranging from photography to film to articles. The journal incorporates a certain theme, such as this year's theme, "categories." (Isa Saalabli/Daily Bruin)

Art organization Graphite focuses on provoking conversation, not specific art forms

Gabe Pine explores a conceptual pairing of love and action movies in his poem “Bonus Round.” The final lines opine, “Action movies are faster now because every action movie rushes home to a love poem.” Pine published his work in May on the online platform for the art organization Graphite. Read more...

Photo: Student-run art organization Graphite accepts entries to their journal and online platform, ranging from photography to film to articles. The journal incorporates a certain theme, such as this year's theme, "categories." (Isa Saalabli/Daily Bruin)

Student-run art organization Graphite accepts entries to their journal and online platform, ranging from photography to film to articles. The journal incorporates a certain theme, such as this year's theme, "categories." (Isa Saalabli/Daily Bruin)

Comic book creator Howard Chaykin spoke at the workshop, "Graphic Design in the Service of Narrative," part of ComicCon 2018. The event, sponsored by UCLA's Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, spanned Monday and Tuesday at Royce Hall. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

Panel discusses influence of historical themes in contemporary comics

Comic book creator Howard Chaykin said kindness is an overrated quality in comic book heroes. “I don’t like reading about perfect people, I like flaws,” he said. Read more...

Photo: Comic book creator Howard Chaykin spoke at the workshop, "Graphic Design in the Service of Narrative," part of ComicCon 2018. The event, sponsored by UCLA's Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, spanned Monday and Tuesday at Royce Hall. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

Comic book creator Howard Chaykin spoke at the workshop, "Graphic Design in the Service of Narrative," part of ComicCon 2018. The event, sponsored by UCLA's Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, spanned Monday and Tuesday at Royce Hall. (Daniel Leibowitz/Daily Bruin staff)

(Claire Sun/Daily Bruin)

Symposium to showcase integration of VR into architecture, design space

Presenters at Visionworlds used virtual reality to turn pancreatic beta cells into a bustling cityscape with anatomic infrastructure. The symposium, which will take place at the UCLA IDEAS campus April 28, aims to show how VR can be integrated into the design process of architectural environments, said Güvenç Özel, lead faculty member and program advisor of IDEAS. Read more...

Photo: (Claire Sun/Daily Bruin)

(Claire Sun/Daily Bruin)

UCLA’s Music of Thailand Ensemble was founded in 1964, but went on hiatus since 1985. The ensemble opened again in 2016, and is open to all students and faculty. (Chengcheng Zhang/Daily Bruin)

Global Melodies: Returning from three decades of hiatus, Thai music ensemble continues to grow

Adjunct assistant professor Supeena Insee Adler revived UCLA’s Music of Thailand Ensemble after spending 100 hours refurbishing decayed Thai instruments. David Morton, a former professor at UCLA’s department of music, originally founded the ensemble in 1964 using instruments he personally acquired from Thailand. Read more...

Photo: UCLA’s Music of Thailand Ensemble was founded in 1964, but went on hiatus since 1985. The ensemble opened again in 2016, and is open to all students and faculty. (Chengcheng Zhang/Daily Bruin)

UCLA’s Music of Thailand Ensemble was founded in 1964, but went on hiatus since 1985. The ensemble opened again in 2016, and is open to all students and faculty. (Chengcheng Zhang/Daily Bruin)